Online citations, reference lists, and bibliographies.

Spatial Heterogeneity In Invasive Species Impacts At The Landscape Scale

Alexander W. Latzka, Gretchen J. A. Hansen, M. S. Kornis, M. J. V. Zanden
Published 2016 · Biology

Cite This
Download PDF
Analyze on Scholarcy
Share
Invasive species have substantial impacts across the globe. While management efforts should aim to minimize undesirable impacts, we have a poor understanding of how impacts of a given invasive species vary spatially. Here, we develop a framework for considering heterogeneity of invasive species impacts that allows us to explore the range of possible spatial patterns of impact. This framework incorporates two factors—how invasive species abundance varies among sites (i.e., abundance distributions) and how invasive species impact varies as a function of abundance (i.e., abundance–impact curves). Combining these two factors allows for the creation of probability distributions that represent how invasive species impacts may vary spatially among sites. We used published abundance distributions and inferred abundance–impact curves to generate impact distributions for two problematic invasive species—zebra mussel and Eurasian watermilfoil—across lakes in Wisconsin, USA. Impact distributions of these species tended to be right-skewed (i.e., the majority of sites had low impacts), although the tail thickness varied. We also simulated how a broader range of combinations of invasive species abundance distributions and abundance–impact curves produce different patterns of invasive species impact. These simulations illustrate a remarkable diversity of invasive species spatial impact patterns—probability distributions of impact were left-skewed, right-skewed, bimodal, and normal. Total landscape-level impacts, estimated by summing site-level impacts, were similarly variable depending on the distribution of site-level impacts. Our results indicate that invasive species abundance and abundance–impact curves ultimately affect how invasive species impacts are distributed across the landscape, which has important implications for invasive species management.
This paper references
10.1016/J.ECOLECON.2004.10.002
Update on the environmental and economic costs associated with alien-invasive species in the United States
D. Pimentel (2005)
In - troduced species policy , management , and future research needs
T. J. Stohlgren (2005)
10.1046/J.1365-2427.2003.01071.X
Predicting the impacts of an introduced species from its invasion history: an empirical approach applied to zebra mussel invasions
A. Ricciardi (2003)
10.1111/j.1539-6924.2006.00707.x
Risk Analysis for Biological Hazards: What We Need to Know About Invasive Species
T. Stohlgren (2006)
10.1007/s100210000048
Sustainability of the Lake Superior Fish Community: Interactions in a Food Web Context
J. Kitchell (2000)
10.1007/s10530-008-9317-z
We can eliminate invasions or live with them. Successful management projects
D. Simberloff (2008)
10.1111/j.1461-0248.2010.01440.x
Controlling established invaders: integrating economics and spread dynamics to determine optimal management.
Rebecca S. Epanchin-Niell (2010)
10.1111/J.1469-8137.2007.02207.X
Plant invasion across space and time: factors affecting nonindigenous species success during four stages of invasion.
Kathleen A. Theoharides (2007)
10.1890/09-1639.1
Using ecological niche models to predict the abundance and impact of invasive species: application to the common carp.
Stefanie A Kulhanek (2011)
10.1890/09-1452.1
Is invasion history a useful tool for predicting the impacts of the world's worst aquatic invasive species?
Stefanie A Kulhanek (2011)
10.1016/S0169-5347(01)02101-2
Progress in invasion biology: predicting invaders.
C. Kolar (2001)
10.1016/j.envres.2011.05.024
A broad framework to organize and compare ecological invasion impacts.
M. Thomsen (2011)
10.1111/cobi.12051
Six Common Mistakes in Conservation Priority Setting
E. Game (2013)
10.1890/02-5301
ALIEN FISHES IN CALIFORNIA WATERSHEDS: CHARACTERISTICS OF SUCCESSFUL AND FAILED INVADERS
M. P. Marchetti (2004)
10.1126/SCIENCE.1075753
Ecological Predictions and Risk Assessment for Alien Fishes in North America
C. Kolar (2002)
10.1890/14-2172.1
A unified approach for quantifying invasibility and degree of invasion.
Q. Guo (2015)
10.1890/1540-9295(2005)003[0012:ISPMAF]2.0.CO;2
Introduced species policy, management, and future research needs
D. Simberloff (2005)
10.5751/ES-00557-070301
Assessing Future Ecosystem Services: a Case Study of the Northern Highlands Lake District, Wisconsin
G. Peterson (2003)
10.1139/Z05-182
Gorging on gobies: beneficial effects of alien prey on a threatened vertebrate
R. B. King (2006)
10.1098/rspb.2003.2327
Mechanisms underlying the impacts of exotic plant invasions
J. Levine (2003)
10.1023/A:1010034312781
Impact: Toward a Framework for Understanding the Ecological Effects of Invaders
I. Parker (2004)
10.1126/science.1127609
Global Biodiversity Conservation Priorities
T. Brooks (2006)
10.1086/282586
A Note on Trophic Complexity and Community Stability
R. T. Paine (1969)
10.1080/07352680490514673
Causes and Consequences of Invasive Plants in Wetlands: Opportunities, Opportunists, and Outcomes
J. Zedler (2004)
10.1007/s10530-010-9866-9
Linear and non-linear impacts of a non-native plant invasion on soil microbial community structure and function
K. Elgersma (2010)
10.1016/J.ECOLECON.2010.09.011
The effect of an aquatic invasive species (Eurasian watermilfoil) on lakefront property values
C. Zhang (2010)
10.4039/entm9745fv
The Functional Response of Predators to Prey Density and its Role in Mimicry and Population Regulation
C. S. Holling (1965)
10.1086/284267
On the Relationship between Abundance and Distribution of Species
J. H. Brown (1984)
10.1890/08-0442.1
Managing the impact of invasive species: the value of knowing the density-impact curve.
Hiroyuki Yokomizo (2009)
10.3394/0380-1330(2007)33[125:IACDPA]2.0.CO;2
Identifying and Characterizing Dominant Plants as an Indicator of Community Condition
Christin B. Frieswyk (2007)
10.1034/J.1600-0706.2002.970201.X
Characterizing ecosystem‐level consequences of biological invasions: the role of ecosystem engineers
J. Crooks (2002)
10.1046/J.1523-1739.2002.01057.X
Directing research to reduce the impacts of nonindigenous species
J. Byers (2002)
10.1038/35002501
Biodiversity hotspots for conservation priorities
N. Myers (2000)
10.1890/13-0183.1
Progress toward understanding the ecological impacts of nonnative species
A. Ricciardi (2013)
10.1007/s10530-009-9605-2
Impact assessment revisited: improving the theoretical basis for management of invasive alien species
J. Thiele (2009)
10.1890/13-1339.1
Predicting the spread of aquatic invaders: insight from 200 years of invasion by zebra mussels.
Alexander Y. Karatayev (2015)
10.1890/120120
What is the “real” impact of invasive plant species?
J. Barney (2013)
10.1007/s00442-014-2899-5
Experimental evidence that ecological effects of an invasive fish are reduced at high densities
M. S. Kornis (2014)
10.2307/1312990
Challenges in the Quest for Keystones
M. Power (1996)
10.1126/SCIENCE.287.5459.1770
Global biodiversity scenarios for the year 2100.
O. Sala (2000)
10.1890/09-1249.1
What a difference a species makes: a meta–analysis of dreissenid mussel impacts on freshwater ecosystems
S. Higgins (2010)
10.1007/978-94-015-9956-6_43
Impacts of Zebra Mussels on Aquatic Communities and their Role as Ecosystem Engineers
A. Karatayev (2002)
10.1371/journal.pone.0077415
Commonly Rare and Rarely Common: Comparing Population Abundance of Invasive and Native Aquatic Species
Gretchen J. A. Hansen (2013)



This paper is referenced by
10.1007/s10021-016-0102-z
A Framework for Evaluating Heterogeneity and Landscape-Level Impacts of Non-native Aquatic Species
M. J. V. Zanden (2016)
10.1111/WRE.12359
Site‐specific management is crucial to managing Mikania micrantha
David Roy Clements (2019)
10.1007/s10530-020-02334-1
Heterogeneity in flow disturbance around river confluences influences spatial patterns in native and non-native species co-occurrence
Nixie C. Boddy (2020)
10.1002/ece3.3594
Individual size variation reduces spatial variation in abundance of tree community assemblage, not of tree populations
Hua-Feng Wang (2017)
10.1002/AQC.2705
Assessing vulnerability of New Zealand lakes to loss of conservation value from invasive fish impacts
Kevin J. Collier (2017)
10.1111/ddi.13063
Density dependence mediates the ecological impact of an invasive fish
Emma M. DeRoy (2020)
The context-dependency of predator-prey and competitive interactions between the invasive eastern mosquitofish, Gambusia holbrooki, and native Australian freshwater fauna
L. K. Lopez (2017)
10.1111/1365-2664.12934
A dynamical model for invasive round goby populations reveals efficient and effective management options
A. N’Guyen (2018)
10.1002/ecy.2717
Biotic homogenization within and across eight widely distributed grasslands following invasion by Bromus inermis.
Gisela C Stotz (2019)
10.1111/EFF.12300
Divergent life histories of invasive round gobies (Neogobius melanostomus) in Lake Michigan and its tributaries
M. S. Kornis (2017)
10.1111/eth.12941
The effect of density on aggression between a highly invasive and native fish
L. K. Lopez (2019)
10.1111/FWB.12900
Responses of a wetland ecosystem to the controlled introduction of invasive fish
D. L. Preston (2017)
10.1111/1365-2745.13124
Alien plants can be associated with a decrease in local and regional native richness even when at low abundance
M. Bernard‐Verdier (2019)
10.1002/ece3.3232
The influence of herbivory and weather on the vital rates of two closely related cactus species
Kristen E Sauby (2017)
10.1111/fwb.13468
Constraining invader dominance: Effects of repeated herbicidal management and environmental factors on curlyleaf pondweed dynamics in 50 Minnesota lakes
Michael R. Verhoeven (2020)
10.1002/ECS2.2415
The relationship between invader abundance and impact
H. R. Sofaer (2018)
Semantic Scholar Logo Some data provided by SemanticScholar