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Creative Industry And Cultural Policy In Asia Reconsidered

A. Fung
Published 2016 · Economics

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Fung presents a general mapping of the global creative industries, with a critique of a nation-driven cultural policy as a departure, particularly in Asia. The chapter argues that, despite operating more or less on a free-market economy, the non-Asian cultural industries are equally protected by a neo-liberal global policy with the formation of collaborative consortiums or communities that project and mold their creative industries in certain directions. Despite this, there are cases in which some creative industries can work relatively autonomous outside these kinds of hegemonic controls.
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