Online citations, reference lists, and bibliographies.
← Back to Search

The Direct Intra-arterial Method For Ambulatory Blood Pressure Recording: Present Status And Future Applications

E. Raftery
Published 1990 · Medicine

Save to my Library
Download PDF
Analyze on Scholarcy Visualize in Litmaps
Share
Reduce the time it takes to create your bibliography by a factor of 10 by using the world’s favourite reference manager
Time to take this seriously.
Get Citationsy
The indirect method for blood pressure recording devised by Riva-Rocci has not changed substantially since the first description. The technique is known to be inaccurate and slow-moving, and there are no satisfactory explanations for most of the observed and measured inaccuracies (6, 14). In contrast, the direct methods for measuring blood pressure have steadily increased in accuracy and sophistication, and it is recognised that these techniques are precise and rapid-moving. The direct techniques are the only available methods for accurate recording of blood pressure, and the Oxford technique developed by Scott and his colleagues (1) in the laboratories of Sir Georg Pickering is of particular importance because it remains the only way of obtaining accurate information on blood pressure variability in the ambulant individual subject. The technique has been shown to be safe (10), but it is invasive and this factor limits its application to a few centers engaged in research with the resources to ensure continued safety.
This paper references
10.1007/978-3-642-49737-7_15
Spontaneous blood-pressure variations in hypertension; the effect of antihypertensive therapy and correlations with the incidence of complications
K. Bock (1966)
10.1093/CVR/2.2.210
The indirect method of recording blood pressure.
E. Raftery (1968)
Direct arterial pressure recording in unrestricted man.
Bevan At (1969)
10.1016/0002-8703(74)90011-8
Direct arterial pressure, pulse rate, and electrocardiogram during micturition and defecation in unrestricted man.
W. Littler (1974)
10.1016/0009-8981(74)90014-X
Circadian variations of plasma catecholamine, cortisol and immunoreactive insulin concentrations in supine subjects.
M. Turton (1974)
10.1136/hrt.37.11.1133
Circumstances attending 100 sudden deaths from coronary artery disease with coroner's necropsies.
A. Myers (1975)
10.1016/S0140-6736(78)92998-7
CIRCADIAN VARIATION OF BLOOD-PRESSURE
M. Millar-Craig (1978)
10.1042/CS057375S
The effects of metoprolol on ambulatory blood pressure.
S. Mann (1979)
10.1042/CS057291S
Physical activity and the circadian rhythm of blood pressure.
S. Mann (1979)
10.1016/S0140-6736(81)92799-9
DOES PLACEBO LOWER BLOOD-PRESSURE?
B. Gould (1981)
10.3109/14639238209010702
The assessment of continuous ambulatory blood pressure records.
B. Sayers (1982)
10.1161/01.CIR.68.3.477
Circadian variation of blood pressure in autonomic failure.
S. Mann (1983)
10.1136/hrt.50.1.85
Simultaneous recording of continuous arterial pressure, heart rate, and ST segment in ambulant patients with stable angina pectoris.
A. Davies (1983)
10.1016/0167-5273(84)90170-0
The safety of ambulatory intra-arterial pressure monitoring: a clinical audit of 1000 studies.
S. Mann (1984)
10.1136/hrt.52.1.93
Circadian rhythm of blood pressure in patients dependent on ventricular demand pacemakers.
A. Davies (1984)
10.3109/10641968509073547
Superiority of 24-hour measurement of blood pressure over clinic values in determining prognosis in hypertension.
S. Mann (1985)
10.1097/00004872-198706000-00001
Atrial natriuretic peptide: a new factor in blood pressure control.
R. Lang (1987)
10.1007/978-3-642-72423-7_27
Blood pressure in normal subjects
M. Weber (1990)



This paper is referenced by
Semantic Scholar Logo Some data provided by SemanticScholar