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Gluteoplasty For The Treatment Of Fecal Incontinence

L. Mcphail, C. Hultman
Published 2007 · Medicine

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Fecal incontinence is a devastating condition in which patients have extremely poor quality of life, with limitations in social interaction, physical activity, and employability. Defined as incomplete control of the fecal stream, fecal incontinence may be due to a number of factors, such as increased stool production, decreased rectal vault capacitance, diminished rectal distension sensibility, and anal sphincter disruption. Despite such medical therapies as motility inhibitors, stool-bulking agents, biofeedback, and Kegel exercises, these interventions may only provide limited relief from this disabling condition [1].
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