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The Varieties Of Resistance In Group Psychotherapy Considered From The Viewpoint Of Adaptation

R. S. Parker
Published 2005 · Psychology, Medicine

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SummaryResistance in group therapy in particular was considered from the point of view that the unchanging behavior reveals the patient's generalized mode of adaptation utilized to maintain stability and avoid anxiety while achieving his goals. “Constitutional” resistance (I.) refers to the imprecise response of the nervous and vegetative systems to changing circumstances, divisible into (A) genetic lag and (B) cognitive styles, with clinical manifestations of chronic posicatastrophic stress reaction, certain psychosomatic phenomena, and perceptual distortions such as defective reception, attribution, and projection. “Dynamic Maintenance of Stability” (II.) is subdivided into (A) The self-signaling system: feeling of weakness; blaming others; and (B) overt-social-manipulative efforts: (1) Learned role as a patient: passivity; and (2) Unwillingness to yield infantile gratification: weak motivation; pseudoparticipation; defective transmission; nonverbal behavior; character armoring; disturbing activities; and, transference. The topic is approached as an extension of the biological theory of adaptation.
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