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Effects Of Global Climatic Warming On The Boreal Forest

S. Kojima
Published 2006 · Biology

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On the basis of the predictions of the global climatic warming induced by anthropogenic activities, as provided by climatologists, current state of knowledge regarding possible ecological consequences of the warming on the boreal biome was discussed. A 600 to 700 km northward advance of the biome along with the warming was predicted. Such a shift could take place for half a century or so, which would be an unprecedentedly fast rate of progression. This might cause a serious disorder in species composition of the biome, particularly in the boundary regions. As to the carbon sink or source issues, considerable uncertainties and knowledge gaps existed. Elevated temperature and CO2 levels would stimulate photosynthesis to result in an increase of CO2 uptake, while the temperature increase would promote decomposition of organic matter especially that stored in the soils to release CO2 to the atmosphere. Behaviors of northern peat bogs, whereca. 700 Gt of organic matter was thought to be accumulated, would seriously affect the balance. However, overall ecosystematic carbon balance was yet to be fully studied. It was realized that multifunctional approaches needed to be developed so as to integrate pieces of various information into a holistic picture. Need for international collaboration research efforts was also addressed.
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