Online citations, reference lists, and bibliographies.

Parameter Estimation In Modeling Phosphocreatine Recovery In Human Skeletal Muscle

L. Arsac, E. Thiaudiére, P. Diolez, L. Gerville-Réache
Published 2003 · Medicine

Cite This
Download PDF
Analyze on Scholarcy
Share
Commonly, muscle phosphocreatine (PCr) recovery from exercise has been fitted to a monoexponential function. However, a number of experiments indicate that at low muscle pH, a monoexponential fit is not suitable. We have performed in vivo 31P-MRS measurements of PCr during recovery from high-intensity intermittent exercise where muscle pH dropped below 6.5 (35 out of 40 cases). Results of a statistical analysis showed that monoexponentiality should be rejected in 32 out of 40 cases. Therefore, a Monte Carlo simulation was carried out to test the quality of competing models used in the literature at low pH: monoexponential, biexponential and changing rate utilization resource (CRUR). For each model, random Gaussian-distributed errors were imposed on simulated PCr recovery before performing the fits. A monoexponential function (three estimated parameters) provided a correct estimation of parameters (unbiased, normally distributed, poorly correlated estimates) and, therefore, should be preferred. When alternative functions are required, as in 32 cases out of 40 in the present study, it is demonstrated that a biexponential function (five estimated parameters) is not well suited (estimates were correlated), whereas a CRUR function (four estimated parameters) provides correct estimation of the parameters. It is concluded that a biexponential fit to PCr recovery is too sensitive to experimental errors to be practicable. Statistical and physiological relevance of CRUR are discussed.
This paper references
10.1152/ajpcell.1997.272.2.C501
Linear dependence of muscle phosphocreatine kinetics on oxidative capacity.
A. Paganini (1997)
Bio - energetics of intact human muscle . A 31 P - nuclear magnetic resonance study
DJ Taylor (1983)
10.1085/jgp.86.1.135
First-order kinetics of muscle oxygen consumption, and an equivalent proportionality between QO2 and phosphorylcreatine level. Implications for the control of respiration
M. Mahler (1985)
10.1152/jappl.1990.69.4.1538
Exponential fitting of pressure-volume curves: confidence limits and sensitivity to noise.
D. Eidelman (1990)
10.1152/jappl.1994.77.1.5
Simultaneous in vivo measurements of HbO2 saturation and PCr kinetics after exercise in normal humans.
K. McCully (1994)
10.1152/ajpcell.1988.254.4.C548
A linear model of muscle respiration explains monoexponential phosphocreatine changes.
R. Meyer (1988)
10.1007/BF02673641
Estimation of a function observed with a stationary error
V. Solev (2000)
The control of muscle oxygen consumption after heavy exercise
Prampero PE di (1984)
10.1097/00007890-198809000-00003
A 31P NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE STUDY
C. Fraser (1988)
10.1152/ajpcell.1997.272.2.C491
Effect of acidosis on control of respiration in skeletal muscle.
S. Harkema (1997)
10.1152/JAPPLPHYSIOL.01024.2000
Metabolic determinants of the onset of acidosis in exercising human muscle: a 31P-MRS study.
M. Roussel (2003)
10.1152/JAPPL.1998.84.2.709
Parameter estimation and confidence intervals for Xe-CT ventilation studies: a Monte Carlo approach.
B. Simon (1998)
10.1249/00005768-199503000-00014
Phosphocreatine kinetics in humans during exercise and recovery.
D. Mccann (1995)
10.1152/jappl.1997.82.1.329
A model for phosphocreatine resynthesis.
A. Nevill (1997)
Bioenergetics of intact human muscle. A 31P nuclear magnetic resonance study.
D. J. Taylor (1983)
10.1152/JAPPL.1999.86.6.2013
Skeletal muscle phosphocreatine recovery in exercise-trained humans is dependent on O2 availability.
L. Haseler (1999)
10.1152/ajpcell.1997.272.2.C525
Noninvasive measurement of phosphocreatine recovery kinetics in single human muscles.
G. Walter (1997)
10.1152/jappl.1993.75.6.2493
Stochastic model of the pulmonary airway tree and its implications for bronchial responsiveness.
J. Bates (1993)
Regulation analysis of energy metabolism.
M. Brand (1997)
10.1152/jappl.1995.78.6.2131
Skeletal muscle mitochondrial function studied by kinetic analysis of postexercise phosphocreatine resynthesis.
C. Thompson (1995)
10.1007/BF00585149
The time course of phosphorylcreatine resynthesis during recovery of the quadriceps muscle in man
R. Harris (1976)
10.1113/jphysiol.1995.sp020533
Recovery of power output and muscle metabolites following 30 s of maximal sprint cycling in man.
G. Bogdanis (1995)
10.1111/J.1469-7793.2000.T01-1-00203.X
Oxidative capacity and ageing in human muscle.
K. Conley (2000)
Additive and multiplicative semiparametric models in accelerated life testing and survival analysis
V. Bagdonavicius (1998)



This paper is referenced by
10.2114/JPA2.25.267
Effect of blood lactate concentration and the level of oxygen uptake immediately before a cycling sprint on neuromuscular activation during repeated cycling sprints.
R. Matsuura (2006)
10.1038/srep30568
Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Phosphocreatine and Determination of BOLD Kinetics in Lower Extremity Muscles using a Dual-Frequency Coil Array
Ryan Brown (2016)
10.5167/uzh-40407
Exercise protocol and muscular fiber type composition dependent phosphocreatine recovery in health and disease
M. Jauslin (2010)
10.1080/02640410500244697
Assessing the limitations of the Banister model in monitoring training
P. Hellard (2006)
10.1002/nbm.4266
Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in skeletal muscle: Experts' consensus recommendations.
M. Krššák (2020)
ESTIMATIVA DOS METABOLISMOS ANAERÓBIOS NO DÉFICIT MÁXIMO ACUMULADO DE OXIGÊNIO
Escola Superior de Educação (2008)
10.2114/JPA2.26.51
A 350-S recovery period does not necessarily allow complete recovery of peak power output during repeated cycling sprints.
R. Matsuura (2007)
10.1016/j.acra.2011.02.014
The feasibility of measuring phosphocreatine recovery kinetics in muscle using a single-shot (31)P RARE MRI sequence.
R. Greenman (2011)
Aspects of modelling performance in competitive cycling
P. Cangley (2012)
10.1556/APhysiol.99.2012.2.12
Effects of humoral factors on ventilation kinetics during recovery after impulse-like exercise.
R. Afroundeh (2012)
10.1007/s00421-007-0512-x
Effect of oral administration of sodium bicarbonate on surface EMG activity during repeated cycling sprints
R. Matsuura (2007)
Instructions for use Title Effect of oral administration of sodium bicarbonate on surface EMG activity during repeated cyclingsprints
R. Matsuura (2017)
10.1002/mrm.24484
Rapid 3D-imaging of phosphocreatine recovery kinetics in the human lower leg muscles with compressed sensing.
P. Parasoglou (2012)
Human Electro-Muscular Incapacitation (HEMI): Physiological Modeling Weapons
Owen T. Price (2018)
10.1136/bjsm.2009.068007
Effects of resistive load on performance and surface EMG activity during repeated cycling sprints on a non-isokinetic cycle ergometer
R. Matsuura (2009)
Semantic Scholar Logo Some data provided by SemanticScholar