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Effect Of Solid Lipid Nanoparticles Formulation Compositions On Their Size, Zeta Potential And Potential For In Vitro PHIS-HIV-Hugag Transfection

Rathapon Asasutjarit, Sven-Iver Lorenzen, S. Sirivichayakul, K. Ruxrungtham, U. Ruktanonchai, G. Ritthidej
Published 2007 · Medicine, Chemistry

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PurposeThis work was conducted to determine model equations describing the effect of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) formulation compositions on their size and zeta potential using the face-centered central composite design and to determine the effect of SLN formulation compositions on the potential for in vitro pHIS-HIV-hugag transfection.Materials and MethodsSLN were prepared by the hot high pressure homogenization technique using cetylpalmitate as lipid matrix at varying concentrations of Tween 80 and Span 85 mixture, dimethyldioctadecyl ammonium bromide (DDAB) and cholesterol. Size and zeta potential used as responses of the design were measured at pH 7.0. The model equations were accepted as statistical significance at p value of less than 0.05. Ability of SLN to form complex with pHIS-HIV-hugag was evaluated by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. In vitro cytotoxicity of SLN was studied in HeLa cells using alamar blue bioassay. The potential of SLN for in vitro pHIS-HIV-hugag transfection was also determined in HeLa cells by western blot technique.ResultsSLN possessed diameter in a range of 136–191 nm and zeta potential 11–61 mV depending on the concentrations of surfactant mixture, DDAB and cholesterol. The regression analysis showed that the model equations of responses fitted well with quadratic equations. The ability of SLN to form complex with pHIS-HIV-hugag was also affected by formulation compositions. In vitro cytotoxicity results demonstrated that HeLa cells were not well tolerant of high concentrations of SLN but still survived in a range of 100–200 μg/ml of SLN in culture medium. The results of transfection study showed ability of SLN to use as a vector for in vitro pHIS-HIV-hugag transfection. However, their potential for in vitro transfection was lower than the established transfection reagent.ConclusionsSize and zeta potential of SLN could be predicted from their quadratic model equations achieved by combination of three variables surfactant, DDAB and cholesterol concentrations. In addition, these variables also affected the potential of SLN as a vector for in vitro pHIS-HIV-hugag transfection. The results here provide the framework for further study involving the SLN formulation design for DNA delivery.
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