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Direct And Indirect Interactions Between Landscape Structure And Invasive Or Overabundant Species

A. Rodewald, P. Arcese
Published 2016 · Biology

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We reviewed recent literature to evaluate interactions between landscape structure (i.e., composition and configuration of landscapes) and overabundant and/or invasive species or “undesirable” species. Undesirable species are strongly associated with fragmented landscapes, especially those with linearly arranged elements to facilitate dispersal, and with land uses that serve as population sources. In some cases, structural legacies, such as land use histories, were as important as current landscape patterns. Many undesirable species also influenced landscape structure by altering disturbance regimes via a wide range of abiotic and biotic mechanisms, including by affecting abundance of keystone, foundation or engineering species at landscape scales, and by changing species interactions in ways that prompted community-level changes. In some instances, the effects of species on landscapes facilitated invasion and/or population growth to establish positive feedback cycles. Understanding the reciprocal effects of landscape pattern on invasive and overabundant species can help guide effective management strategies by increasing the cost-efficiency of conservation investments and prioritizing conservation actions.
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