Online citations, reference lists, and bibliographies.
← Back to Search

Herbaceous Crops On Marginal Sites — Erosion And Economics

D. Vaughan, J. Cundiff, D. Parrish
Published 1989 · Environmental Science

Save to my Library
Download PDF
Analyze on Scholarcy
Share
Erosional and economic analyses of herbaceous energy cropping on marginal sites in the Virginia Piedmont have been conducted in conjunction with a US Department of Energy-funded project. Eight species (sorghum-sudangrass, switchgrass, weeping lovegrass, tall fescue, sericea lespedeza, flatpea, crownvetch, and birdsfoot trefoil) are being evaluated in a five-year study for their potential to produce biomass on three Virginia Piedmont soils (Appling, Cecil and Davidson) that are acidic and highly erodible. Erosional analyses using the Universal Soil Loss Equation suggested that no-till seeding methods and crop perenniality combine to produce low levels of erosion, even on highly erodible sites. Except for sorghum-sudangrass and birdsfoot trefoil grown on Cecil and Davidson soils, erosion levels, which ranged from 1.6 to 9.1 Mg ha−1, were within the US Soil Conservation Service tolerance levels and were not appreciably greater than the soil loss for undisturbed land, which ranged from 1.6 to 5.4 Mg ha−1. Economic analyses showed that annual costs for biomass production computed on the basis of land area or amount of biomass are quite species-dependent, and the high-yielding warm-season perennial grasses showed the most promise, based on the preliminary yield data obtained during the first three seasons. Per-unit costs of production of the energy crops were greatly influenced by land area in production and biomass yield.
This paper references



This paper is referenced by
10.5539/JAS.V5N12P132
Economic Efficiency of Different Agricultural Practices of "Panicum virgatum L. (switchgrass)" for Fodder Production
K. Giannoulis (2013)
10.3390/EN12163123
Marginal Agricultural Land Low-Input Systems for Biomass Production
M. Cossel (2019)
10.1016/J.LANDUSEPOL.2014.04.004
Assessing the efficiency of switchgrass different cultural practices for pellet production
K. Giannoulis (2014)
10.2134/CFTM2016.0012
Seedbed Preparation and Planting Depth Affect Switchgrass Establishment and Yield
T. J. Butler (2016)
10.1016/0960-8524(95)00176-X
Switchgrass as a sustainable bioenergy crop
M. Sanderson (1996)
Investigations on rangeland grasshoppers: Ecoregion level distribution, identification, feeding performance, and vegetation clipping
M. I. Ullah (2012)
10.3954/1523-5475-27.1.1
Insect Diversity in Switchgrass Grown for Biofuel in South Carolina
C. Holguin (2010)
10.31274/rtd-180813-16787
Examination of lignocellulosic fibers for chemical, thermal, and separations properties: Addressing thermo-chemical stability issues
C. Johnson (2007)
STUDYING OF SWITCHGRASS INSECTS DIVERSITY AND ASSASMENT OF THE POTENTIAL PESTS
Tatyana Stefanovska (2013)
A Farm-Level Evaluation of Conditions Under Which Farmers Will Supply Biomass Feedstocks for Energy Production
J. Larson (2005)
10.1016/J.BIOMBIOE.2006.09.001
A full economic analysis of switchgrass under different scenarios in Italy estimated by BEE model.
A. Monti (2007)
10.1016/J.BIOMBIOE.2015.09.007
Profitability of the production of energy grasses on marginal agricultural land in Sweden
D. Nilsson (2015)
10.1016/0144-4565(89)90061-9
No-till establishment of perennial, warm-season grasses for biomass production
D. Wolf (1989)
Invasive Chinese Lespedeza (Lespedeza cuneata [Dum.-Cours.] G. Don) Alters the Root and Rhizosphere Fungal Communities of Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) in Northern Virginia
R. Andrews (2011)
INSECT DIVERSITY AND PEST STATUS ON SWITCHGRASS GROWN FOR BIOFUEL IN SOUTH CAROLINA
C. Holguin (2010)
10.1016/0960-8524(92)90186-2
Potential economic return from fiber residues produced as by-products of juice expression from sweet sorghum
J. Worley (1992)
10.1017/S0889189300004665
Biomass as an energy source for the midwestern U.S.
D. Keeney (1992)
10.1016/S0167-1987(01)00238-0
Evaluation of the establishment of lowland and upland switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) varieties under different tillage and seedbed conditions in northern Italy.
A. Monti (2001)
10.1039/C5RA13073E
Growth responses and accumulation of cadmium in switchgrass (Panicumvirgatum L.) and prairie cordgrass (Spartinapectinata Link)
Chaolan Zhang (2015)
10.1007/s12155-011-9145-3
Salinity Effects on Germination and Plant Growth of Prairie Cordgrass and Switchgrass
S. Kim (2011)
10.1080/07352680500316433
The Biology and Agronomy of Switchgrass for Biofuels
D. Parrish (2005)
10.1016/j.envsoft.2017.03.027
Marginal land suitability for switchgrass, Miscanthus and hybrid poplar in the Upper Mississippi River Basin (UMRB)
Qingyu Feng (2017)
10.1002/BBB.1430
Dedicated crops for advanced biofuels: Consistent and diverging agronomic points of view between the USA and the EU-27
W. Zegada-Lizarazu (2013)
10.1016/J.EJA.2016.05.006
Perennial wild plant mixtures for biomass production: Impact of species composition dynamics on yield performance over a five-year cultivation period in southwest Germany
M. Cossel (2016)
Semantic Scholar Logo Some data provided by SemanticScholar