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Optimization Of Pilocarpine Loading Onto Nanoparticles By Sorption Procedures

T. Harmia, P. Speiser, J. Kreuter
Published 1986 · Chemistry

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Abstract The sorption behaviour of pilocarpine salts, such as nitrate and hydrochloride, onto poly(methylmethacrylate), (PMMA), poly(butylcyanoacrylate), (PBCA) and poly(hexylcyanoacrylate), (PHCA) nanoparticles was studied. Pilocarpine nitrate was more suitable for adsorption, because of its lower water solubility. The PBCA nanoparticles showed the best adsorption properties of the 3 above mentioned polymer materials. With electrolytes, i.e. sodium salts such as nitrate, chloride and sulfate, the amount of pilocarpine nitrate adsorbed onto the PBCA-nanoparticles could be increased significantly. Sodium sulfate had the highest sorption enhancing effect caused by its ionic strength and its system stabilizing effect. Surfactants used above their CMC appeared to have no adsorption promoting effect. However, non-ionic surfactants below the CMC, used after a pretreatment of either lyophilization alone or washing and additional lyophilization prior to adsorption of pilocarpine, improved the adsorption behaviour of this drug even more than electrolytes. The surfactants with the longest hydrocarbon chain length showed the best adsorption increasing effect. For the adsorption of pilocarpine nitrate onto washed, lyophilized PBCA nanoparticles both the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms were observed. These isotherms are sigmoidal in shape indicating a building up of multilayers.
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