Online citations, reference lists, and bibliographies.
Please confirm you are human
(Sign Up for free to never see this)
← Back to Search

Compositional Differences Among Upland And Lowland Switchgrass Ecotypes Grown As A Bioenergy Feedstock Crop

Muhammad Aurangzaib, Muhammad Aurangzaib, K. J. Moore, S. Archontoulis, E. Heaton, A. W. Lenssen, Shui-Zhang Fei
Published 2016 · Biology

Save to my Library
Download PDF
Analyze on Scholarcy
Share
Abstract Feedstock quality mainly depends upon the biomass composition and bioenergy conversion system being used. Higher cellulose and hemicellulose concentrations are desirable for biochemical conversion, whereas higher lignin is favored for thermochemical conversion. The efficiency of these conversion systems is influenced by the presence of high nitrogen and ash concentrations. Switchgrass ( Panicum virgatum L.) varieties are classified into two ecotypes based on their habitat preferences, i.e., upland and lowland. The objectives of this study were to quantify the chemical composition of switchgrass varieties as influenced by harvest management, and to determine if ecotypic differences exist among them. A field study was conducted near Ames, IA during 2012 and 2013. Upland (‘Cave-in-Rock’, ‘Trailblazer’ and ‘Blackwell’) and lowland switchgrass varieties (‘Kanlow’ and ‘Alamo’) were grown in a randomized block design with six replications. Six biomass harvests were collected at approximately 2-week intervals each year. In both years, delaying harvest increased cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin concentrations while decreasing nitrogen and ash concentrations in all varieties. On average, Kanlow had the highest cellulose and hemicellulose concentration (354 and 321 g kg −1 DM respectively), and Cave-in-Rock had the highest lignin concentration (33 g kg −1 DM). The lowest nitrogen and ash concentrations were observed in Kanlow (14 and 95 g kg −1 DM respectively). In general, our results indicate that delaying harvest until fall improves feedstock quality, and ecotypic differences do exist between varieties for important feedstock quality traits. These findings also demonstrate potential for developing improved switchgrass cultivars as bioenergy feedstock by intermating lowland and upland ecotypes.
This paper references
10.1016/S0735-2689(01)80011-3
Genetic Modification of Herbaceous Plants for Feed and Fuel
K. Vogel (2001)
10.1021/EF034067U
Overview of Applications of Biomass Fast Pyrolysis Oil
and S. Czernik (2004)
10.1111/gcbb.12053
Effects of ecotypes and morphotypes in feedstock composition of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.)
Hem S. Bhandari (2014)
10.1016/S0961-9534(97)00016-0
Seasonal dynamics of nutrient accumulation and partitioning in the perennial C4-grasses Miscanthus × giganteus and Spartina cynosuroides
C. V. Beale (1997)
10.2135/CROPSCI2005.04-0007
Management of Switchgrass-Dominated Conservation Reserve Program Lands for Biomass Production in South Dakota
V. Mulkey (2006)
Convergence of Agriculture and Energy: II. Producing Cellulosic Biomass for Biofuels
S. L. Fales (2007)
10.1016/0960-8524(93)90050-L
Power-production options from biomass : the vision of a southern European utility
G. Trebbi (1993)
10.1016/0926-860X(94)80278-5
Catalysis in thermal biomass conversion
A. V. Bridgwater (1994)
10.2134/AGRONJ1999.914696X
Switchgrass biomass and chemical composition for biofuel in Eastern Canada.
I. Madakadze (1999)
10.1094/FG-2008-0220-01-RV
Establishing and managing switchgrass as an energy crop.
D. Parrish (2008)
10.2134/AGRONJ2001.931118X
Predicting Forage Quality in Switchgrass and Big Bluestem
R. Mitchell (2001)
10.2134/AGRONJ2012.0233
Intraseasonal Changes in Switchgrass Nitrogen Distribution Compared with Corn
Danielle M. Wilson (2013)
10.1007/s12155-012-9240-0
Crop Management Impacts Biofuel Quality: Influence of Switchgrass Harvest Time on Yield, Nitrogen and Ash of Fast Pyrolysis Products
Danielle M. Wilson (2012)
10.2135/CROPSCI2004.2930
Latitudinal Adaptation of Switchgrass Populations
M. Casler (2004)
10.1385/ABAB:90:3:251
Pretreatment with ammonia water for enzymatic hydrolysis of corn husk, bagasse, and switchgrass
M. Kurakake (2001)
Harvest and nitrogen management
K. P. Vogel (2002)
10.1126/SCIENCE.1121416
Ethanol Can Contribute to Energy and Environmental Goals
A. E. Farrell (2006)
10.1016/0960-8524(95)00176-X
Switchgrass as a sustainable bioenergy crop
M. Sanderson (1996)
10.2135/CROPSCI2005.0682
Biofuel component concentrations and yields of switchgrass in South Central U.S. environments.
K. A. Cassida (2005)
10.2136/SSSAJ2005.0419
Chemical Composition of Crop Biomass Impacts Its Decomposition
J. Johnson (2007)
10.1126/SCIENCE.1114736
The Path Forward for Biofuels and Biomaterials
A. Ragauskas (2006)
10.1002/BIT.20071
Fermentation of biomass‐generated producer gas to ethanol
Rohit P. Datar (2004)
10.1016/S0961-9534(97)00002-0
Genotypic variation in dry matter accumulation and content of N, K and Cl in Miscanthus in Denmark.
U. Jørgensen (1997)
10.1016/J.JAAP.2005.03.005
Pyrolysis of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) harvested at several stages of maturity
A. Boateng (2006)
10.1007/s12155-014-9484-y
Switchgrass Response to Nitrogen Fertilizer Across Diverse Environments in the USA: a Regional Feedstock Partnership Report
C. O. Hong (2014)
10.2134/AGRONJ2002.0413
Switchgrass biomass production in the Midwest USA: harvest and nitrogen management.
K. Vogel (2002)
Pyrolytic analysis and catalytic upgrading of lignocellulosic materials by molecular beam mass spectrometry
F. A. Ablevor (1992)
10.2134/AGRONJ2010.0374
Composition of native warm-season grasses for bioenergy production in response to nitrogen fertilization rate and harvest date.
N. Waramit (2011)
10.2307/3670396
Cytological and Morphological Variation in Panicum virgatum L.
J. N. Brunken (1975)
10.2134/AGRONJ2005.0351
Biomass Yield and Biofuel Quality of Switchgrass Harvested in Fall or Spring
P. R. Adler (2006)
10.2134/AGRONJ1983.00021962007500050002X
Leaf and Stem Forage Quality of Big Bluestem and Switchgrass1
J. L. Griffin (1983)
10.1016/S0960-8524(01)00212-7
Hydrolysis of lignocellulosic materials for ethanol production: a review.
Y. Sun (2002)
10.1002/JSFA.2740590206
Lignification of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) and big bluestem (Andropogon gerardii) plant parts during maturation and its effect on fibre degradability
H. Jung (1992)
10.1073/pnas.1100310108
Genetic manipulation of lignin reduces recalcitrance and improves ethanol production from switchgrass
C. Fu (2011)
Heggenstaller. Composition of native warm-season grasses for bioenergy production in response to nitrogen fertilization rate and harvest date. Agron
N. Waramit (2011)
10.2134/JEQ2004.0329
Herbaceous vegetation productivity, persistence, and metals uptake on a biosolids-amended mine soil.
G. Evanylo (2005)
10.1016/S0961-9534(02)00073-9
Biomass yield and quality of 20 switchgrass populations in southern Iowa, USA.
R. Lemus (2002)
10.1097/jnn.0b013e318274cc4d
A Review of the
Robert Wolpert (1985)
10.1016/J.BIOMBIOE.2006.02.004
Chemical composition and response to dilute-acid pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification of alfalfa, reed canarygrass, and switchgrass
B. Dien (2006)
Basic research and pilot studies on the enzymatic conversion of lignocellulosics
M. Hayn (1993)
10.1016/s0140-6701(98)96595-x
Evaluating physical, chemical, and energetic properties of perennial grasses as biofuels
S. Mclaughlin (1996)
In Barnes RF et al (eds) Forages. Biomass, energy, and industrial uses of forages. The science of grassland agriculture, Ames, Iowa
M. A. Sanderson (2007)
10.2172/1023318
U.S. Billion-ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry
M. Downing (2011)
10.1073/PNAS.0406069101
A prominent role for the CBF cold response pathway in configuring the low-temperature metabolome of Arabidopsis.
D. Cook (2004)
10.1016/J.GDE.2007.08.012
Molecular breeding of switchgrass for use as a biofuel crop.
J. Bouton (2007)
10.1016/J.BIOMBIOE.2005.10.006
Long-term yield potential of switchgrass-for-biofuel systems.
J. Fike (2006)
10.2134/AGRONJ1999.00021962009100010002X
Harvest management of switchgrass for biomass feedstock and forage production.
M. Sanderson (1999)
10.2135/CROPSCI1988.0011183X002800050011X
Forage quality and digestion kinetics of switchgrass herbage and morphological components
E. Twidwell (1988)



This paper is referenced by
10.3390/AGRONOMY8060088
Biomass Production and Composition of Temperate and Tropical Maize in Central Iowa
P. Infante (2018)
Nutrient cycling in switchgrass and soil health as affected by cover crops
Joshua Ryan Massey (2020)
10.1093/jee/toy292
Effect of Switchgrass Ecotype and Cultivar on Establishment, Feeding, and Development of Fall Armyworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)
Marissa K. Schuh (2018)
A batch culture study of the rumen bacterial community and the fermentative digestion of forage in cattle
K. McDermott (2018)
10.3390/agronomy10121860
Effects of Plant-Soil Feedback on Switchgrass Productivity Related to Microbial Origin
J. R. Kiniry (2020)
10.1016/j.biortech.2017.12.044
High yielding tropical energy crops for bioenergy production: Effects of plant components, harvest years and locations on biomass composition.
K. Surendra (2018)
10.31274/ETD-180810-5564
Evaluating temperate and tropical corn for biomass production in central Iowa
Pedro Alexander Infante-Posada (2016)
10.5772/INTECHOPEN.74014
Bioenergy from Perennial Grasses
Claudia Santibáñez Varnero (2018)
10.15666/AEER/1605_57155743
AGRONOMIC ASPECTS OF SWITCHGRASS CULTIVATION AND USE FOR ENERGY PURPOSES
M. Brodowska (2018)
10.1016/j.indcrop.2019.111773
Performance of switchgrass and Miscanthus genotypes on marginal land in the Yellow River Delta
C. Zheng (2019)
10.3390/resources9060061
Nitrogen Fertilization and Harvest Timing Affect Switchgrass Quality
J. Massey (2020)
10.2134/CFTM2017.08.0053
Switchgrass Growth and Forage Quality Trends Provide Insight for Management
Kenton L. Sena (2018)
10.1016/j.biombioe.2019.105452
Drought minimized nitrogen fertilization effects on bioenergy feedstock quality
S. Emery (2020)
Semantic Scholar Logo Some data provided by SemanticScholar