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Sorptive Interaction Between Goethite And Strongly Reducing Organic Substances From Anaerobic Decomposition Of Green Manures

Qingman Li, Y. Ding, W. Zhang, X. Wang, Guoliang Ji, Yiyong Zhou
Published 2008 · Chemistry

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Strongly reducing organic substances (SROS) and iron oxides exist widely in soils and sediments and have been implicated in many soil and sediment processes. In the present work, the sorptive interaction between goethite and SROS derived from anaerobic decomposition of green manures was investigated by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). Both green manures, Astragaltus sinicus (Astragalus) and Vicia varia (Vicia) were chosen to be anaerobically decomposed by the mixed microorganisms isolated from paddy soils for 30 d to prepare different SROS. Goethite used in experiments was synthesized in laboratory. The anaerobic incubation solutions from green manures at different incubation time were arranged to react with goethite, in which SROS concentration and Fe(II) species were analyzed. The anaerobic decomposition of Astragalus generally produced SROS more in amount but weaker in reducibility than that of Vicia in the same incubation time. The available SROS from Astragalus that could interact with goethite was 0.69 +/- 0.04, 0.84 +/- 0.04 and 1.09 +/- 0.03 cmol kg(-1) as incubated for 10, 15 and 30 d, respectively, for Vicia, it was 0.12 +/- 0.03, 0.46 +/- 0.02 and 0.70 +/- 0.02 cmol kg(-1). One of the fates of SROS as they interacted with goethite was oxidation. The amounts of oxidizable SROS from Astragalus decreased over increasing incubation time from 0.51 +/- 0.05 cmol kg(-1) at day 10 to 0.39 +/- 0.04 cmol kg(-1) at day 30, but for Vicia, it increased with the highest reaching to 0.58 +/- 0.04 cmol kg(-1) at day 30. Another fate of these substances was sorption by goethite. The SROS from Astragalus were sorbed more readily than those from Vicia, and closely depended upon the incubation time, whereas for those from Vicia, the corresponding values were remarkably less and apparently unchangeable with incubation time. The extent of goethite dissolution induced by the anaerobic solution from Vicia was greater than that from Astragalus, showing its higher reactivity. (c) 2008 Published by Elsevier Ltd.
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