Online citations, reference lists, and bibliographies.
← Back to Search

Effects Of Asbestos Fibers On Cell Division, Cell Survival, And Formation Of Thioguanine-resistant Mutants In Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells.

K. Kenne, S. Ljungquist, N. Ringertz
Published 1986 · Chemistry, Medicine

Cite This
Download PDF
Analyze on Scholarcy
Share
The ability of crocidolite fibers to induce point mutations and mitotic abnormalities in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells was examined in cell cultures. The purpose has been to study the possibilities for establishing in vitro test methods to quantify genetic damage induced by asbestos and other mineral fibers. Results obtained with the CHO/hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase system indicated that crocidolite fibers per se do not significantly increase the number of thioguanine-resistant mutants. Crocidolite fibers also failed to potentiate the mutagenicity of benzo[a]pyrene. Time-lapse cinematography and microscopy showed that asbestos (crocidolite) fibers were markedly cytotoxic. Among surviving cells some underwent abnormal cell divisions which resulted in multi- and micronucleate cells. Many cells that contained a few asbestos fibers, however, underwent mitosis and successfully formed two mononucleate daughter cells capable of further divisions. Individual, fiber-containing cells were examined by time-lapse television recordings for 4-5 days. During this time period some cells underwent six divisions and generated an almost normal number of daughter cells. Cells which contained fibers that were longer or equivalent to the diameter of the mitotic cell (20 microns), showed different forms of mitotic abnormalities. The frequency of multinucleate cells was drastically increased following exposure to asbestos fibers. Only rarely, however, did these cells divide to produce viable daughter cells capable of continued cell multiplication. The frequency of multinucleate cells was dependent on the dose of exposure to asbestos fibers and could possibly be used as an index of the degree of mitotic disturbances induced by mineral fibers.
This paper references
10.1016/S0033-7560(70)80072-2
Reaction kinetics and biological action in barley of mono-functional methanesulfonic esters.
S. Osterman-Golkar (1970)
10.1016/0027-5107(77)90047-1
A quantitative assay of mutation induction at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase locus in Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO/HGPRT system): development and definition of the system.
J. O'Neill (1977)
10.1016/0165-1218(79)90158-7
Amosite, chrysotile and crocidolite asbestos are mutagenic in Chinese hamster lung cells.
S. L. Huang (1979)
10.1016/S0304-3835(79)80113-5
Aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase induction in mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes by benzanthracene or cigarette tars adsorbed to asbestos fibers.
T. Mclemore (1979)
10.1016/0300-483X(80)90055-4
Screening of tobacco smoke constituents for mutagenicity using the Ames' test.
I. Florin (1980)
10.1038/bjc.1974.65
The Effects of the Inhalation of Asbestos in Rats
J. Wagner (1974)
10.1016/0027-5107(77)90001-X
Asbestos and glass fibres in bacterial mutation tests.
M. Chamberlain (1977)
10.1038/bjc.1969.70
Mesotheliomas in rats following inoculation with asbestos.
J. Wagner (1969)
10.1016/0165-1218(80)90157-3
The genetic effects of crocidolite asbestos; comparison of chromosome abnormalities and sister-chromatid exchanges
M. Price-Jones (1980)
10.1016/0013-9351(83)90065-8
Enhancement of benzo[a]pyrene mutagenicity by chrysotile asbestos in rat liver epithelial cells.
B. Reiss (1983)
10.1038/275446A0
Asbestos-mediated membrane uptake of benzo[a]pyrene observed by fluorescence spectroscopy
J. R. Lakowicz (1978)
Studies of in vitro asbestos-cell interaction.
M. Wade (1979)
10.1001/JAMA.1968.03140150010003
Asbestos exposure, smoking, and neoplasia.
I. Selikoff (1968)
10.1016/0013-9351(80)90045-6
In vitro cytological and cytogenetic effects of an Indian variety of chrysotile asbestos.
K. Babu (1980)
Asbestos-induced sister chromatid exchanges in cultured Chinese hamster ovarian fibroblast cells.
Livingston Gk (1980)
10.1016/c2009-0-03129-8
Asbestos and Disease
I. J. Selikoff (1978)
Proliferation stimulating effects of chrysotile and crocidolite asbestos fibres on B lymphocyte cell lines.
A. Ueki (1984)
10.1016/0165-7992(83)90026-X
Chromosomal aberrations induced by chrysotile and crocidolite in human lymphocytes in vitro.
F. Valerio (1983)
10.1038/257056a0
Induction of chromosome changes in Chinese hamster cells by exposure to asbestos fibres
A. Sincock (1975)
10.1016/0032-5910(72)80032-9
Preparation of the UICC Standard reference samples of asbestos
V. Timbrell (1972)
10.1021/BI00590A022
Effects of asbetos, iron oxide, silica, and carbon black on the microsomal availability of benzo[a]pyrene.
J. Lakowicz (1979)
10.1016/0027-5107(78)90272-5
Genetic effects of crocidolite asbestos in Chinese hamster lung cells.
S. L. Huang (1978)
10.1016/0165-1218(83)90075-7
Sister-chromatid exchange and cell kinetics in CHO-K1 cells, human fibroblasts and lymphoblastoid cells exposed in vitro to asbestos and glass fibre.
G. Casey (1983)
10.1016/0013-9351(81)90028-1
Mechanisms of asbestos carcinogenesis.
B. Mossman (1981)
10.1084/JEM.99.2.167
PLAQUE FORMATION AND ISOLATION OF PURE LINES WITH POLIOMYELITIS VIRUSES
R. Dulbecco (1954)
10.1016/0006-291X(80)90334-4
Effects of asbestos on membrane transport and metabolism of benzo(a)pyrene.
C. Kandaswami (1980)
10.1016/0165-1161(75)90046-1
Methods for detecting carcinogens and mutagens with the Salmonella/mammalian-microsome mutagenicity test.
B. Ames (1975)
10.1016/0013-9351(75)90080-8
Cytogenetic studies on chrysotile asbestos.
K. S. Lavappa (1975)
10.1016/0013-9351(82)90094-9
Absence of mutagenic activity of three forms of asbestos in liver epithelial cells.
B. Reiss (1982)



This paper is referenced by
10.1289/EHP.00108341
Inhaled crocidolite mutagenicity in lung DNA.
B. Rihn (2000)
10.1002/1520-6866(2000)20:5<273::AID-TCM3>3.0.CO;2-1
Crocidolite induces cell transformation and p53 gene mutation in BALB/c-3T3 cells.
F. Lin (2000)
10.1007/S001289900671
Transplacental Transfer of Asbestos in Pregnant Mice
A. Haque (1998)
Possible Role for p 34 cdc 2 Kinase in Etoposide-induced Cell Death of Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells 1
R. Lock (2006)
10.1080/15513819609168711
Is there transplacental transfer of asbestos? A study of 40 stillborn infants.
A. Haque (1996)
10.1016/0273-2300(92)90011-W
Approaches to evaluating the toxicity and carcinogenicity of man-made fibers: summary of a workshop held November 11-13, 1991, Durham, North Carolina.
R. Mcclellan (1992)
10.1097/JOM.0b013e3181344100
Occupational medicine forum.
Joseph J. Schwerha (2008)
Behavior of crocidolite asbestos during mitosis in living vertebrate lung epithelial cells.
J. Ault (1995)
10.1093/CARCIN/17.9.2013
Long crocidolite asbestos fibers cause polyploidy by sterically blocking cytokinesis.
C. Jensen (1996)
10.1007/b97620
Pathology of Asbestos-Associated Diseases
V. Roggli (2004)
Possible role for p34cdc2 kinase in etoposide-induced cell death of Chinese hamster ovary cells.
R. Lock (1990)
10.1289/EHP.97105S51073
Mechanisms of fiber-induced genotoxicity.
M. Jaurand (1997)
10.1007/978-1-4684-1363-2_24
Mechanisms of Fibre Genotoxicity
M. Jaurand (1991)
10.1007/978-3-642-79041-6_6
Time-Lapse Video Light Microscopic and Electron Microscopic Observations of Vertebrate Epithelial Cells Exposed to Crocidolite Asbestos
C. Jensen (1994)
10.1002/EM.2850250205
Effects of asbestos and man‐made vitreous fibers on cell division in cultured human mesothelial cells in comparison to rodent cells
K. Pelin (1995)
10.1007/978-1-4615-2610-0_16
Determinants of Etoposide Cytotoxicity in Vitro
R. Lock (1994)
Only Public Health Goal for ASBESTOS In Drinking Water
(2002)
10.1177/096032719401300102
Increased Incidence of DNA Double-strand Breaks and Anti-ds DNA Antibodies in Blood of Workers Occupationally Exposed to Asbestos
B. Marczynski (1994)
Chrysotile fiber is a strong mutagen in mammalian cells.
T. Hei (1992)
Crocidolite asbestos fibers undergo size-dependent microtubule-mediated transport after endocytosis in vertebrate lung epithelial cells.
R. Cole (1991)
10.1016/S0013-9351(05)80251-8
On the mechanism of cell internalization of chrysotile fibers: an immunocytochemical and ultrastructural study.
W. Malorni (1990)
10.1136/ijgc-2020-001672
Asbestos and ovarian cancer: examining the historical evidence
B. Slomovitz (2020)
10.1097/JOM.0b013e3181dc6c52
Fantastic voyage and opportunities of engineered nanomaterials: what are the potential risks of occupational exposures?
V. Kagan (2010)
10.1080/00984100050201640
CHRYSOTILE ASBESTOS FIBERS DETECTED IN THE NEWBORN PUPS FOLLOWING GAVAGE FEEDING OF PREGNANT MICE
A. Haque (2001)
10.1002/9781119023647.CH8
Children's and Adult Involuntary and Occupational Exposures and Cancer
A. Colacci (2017)
10.1007/978-3-642-41193-9_10
Experimental Models of Asbestos-Related Diseases
Judson M Englert (2014)
10.1201/9781420061888_ch34
Toxicological profile for asbestos
G. Hanley (2001)
10.1007/978-3-642-73766-4_6
Induction of Sister Chromatid Exchanges by Asbestos Fibres in Combination with Other Mutagens Studied in Chinese Hamster Cells in Vitro
A. Fischer (1988)
10.1007/978-3-642-74203-3_20
Induction of Sister Chromatid Exchanges by Fibrous Dusts Alone and in Combination with Other Xenobiotics in Chinese Hamster Cells
A. Fischer (1989)
10.1007/s10616-014-9797-x
Induction of giant cells by the synthetic food colorants viz. lemon yellow and orange red
V. Prajitha (2014)
10.1186/s41021-015-0003-y
Mechanism of induction of binucleated cells by multiwalled carbon nanotubes as revealed by live-cell imaging analysis
M. Yasui (2015)
Participation of iron and nitric oxide in the mutagenicity of asbestos in hgprt-, gpt+ Chinese hamster V79 cells.
S. H. Park (1998)
See more
Semantic Scholar Logo Some data provided by SemanticScholar