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Viral Xenogenization Of Intact Tumor Cells.

H. Kobayashi
Published 1979 · Biology, Medicine

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Publisher Summary Tumor immunotherapy modifies tumor cells so that they become more foreign to the host. This chapter explores the ways investigators have attempted to make tumor cells foreign to the host by increasing their antigenicity. It reviews attempts to induce new foreign proteins on tumor cells and to increase the antigenicity of existing tumor-specific or tumor-associated antigens (TSA or TAA) on tumor cells. By both of these methods tumor cells can be made more highly immunogenic or more easily immunosensitive to the immune responses of the host. Tumor cells show low antigenicity and are not readily recognized as foreign by the host. By the process of xenogenization of tumor cells infected with a nonlytic budding murine virus, the regression of tumors is caused when inoculated into normal hosts owing to an acquisition of virus-specific antigen that is foreign in the host. Xenogenization is used to describe the process of making a tumor cell antigenically foreign to the host. Studies performed on tumor cells that have been infected with a nonlytic budding virus are summarized in the chapter. It also discusses the acquisition of a virus-specific new antigen in tumor cells.
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