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Controlled Release Of Diclofenac Sodium In Glycolipid Incorporated Micro Emulsions.

E. P. N. Premarathne, D. N. Karunaratne, A. Perera
Published 2016 · Chemistry, Medicine

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The effect of the glycolipid, hexadecyl-β-d-glucopyranoside, incorporated in microemulsions (ME(1)) towards the enhancement of skin absorption and skin permeation of Diclofenac sodium (DS(2)) was evaluated. A Franz diffusion cell with a piece of pig's ear epidermis indicated that the optimized ME formulation with glycolipid (0.05wt%) exhibited significantly higher permeability than the conventional formulations. The releasing profiles of DS from ME formulations exhibited first order release kinetics resembling a diffusion controlled release model for the first 8h. Incorporating hexadecyl-β-D glucopyranoside in ME formulations shows significant potential as a delivery vehicle in the cosmetics and pharmaceutical industry.
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