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How Can A Short Stem Hip Implant Preserve The Natural, Pre-surgery Force Flow? A Finite Element Analysis On A Collar Cortex Compression Concept (CO4).

B. Eidel, A. Gote, A. Ohrndorf, H-J Christ
Published 2018 · Materials Science, Medicine

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The present work proposes a simple, novel fixation concept for short stem hip endoprostheses, which preserves the pre-surgery force flow through femoral bone to an unprecedented extent. It is demonstrated by finite element analyses that a standard implant model endowed with minor geometrical changes can overcome bone loading reduction and can achieve almost physiological conditions. The numerical results underpin that the key aspect of the novel, so-called "collar cortex compression concept CO4" is the direct, almost full load transmission from the implant collar to the resected femur cortex, which implies that the implant stem must be smooth and therefore interacts mainly by normal contact with the surrounding bone. For a stem endowed with surface porosity at already small areas, it is mainly the stem which transmits axial forces by shear, whereas the collar shows considerable unloading, which is the standard metaphyseal fixation. Only in the latter case the implant-bone stiffness contrast induces stress shielding, whereas for CO4 stress shielding is avoided almost completely, although the implant is made of a stiff Ti-alloy. CO4 is bionics-inspired in that it mimics force transmission at implant-bone interfaces following the natural conditions and it thereby preserves pre-surgery bone architecture as an optimized solution of nature.
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