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Application Of An Automated Particle‐based Immunosensor For The Detection Of Aflatoxin B1 In Foods

N. Strachan, P. G. John, I. Millar
Published 1997 · Chemistry

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A method using an automated particle immunosensor is described which can easily detect aflatoxin B1 down to a level of 4 ng g‐1 (4 ppb) in reference food materials. The assay takes approximately 8 min and employs a simple extraction procedure which takes <60 min to complete. Experiments with other aflatoxins indicate that only G2 shows significant cross‐reactivity (23%). The potential of the method for both surveillance and application in the food industry is assessed.
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