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Strigolactones And The Regulation Of Pea Symbioses In Response To Nitrate And Phosphate Deficiency.

E. Foo, K. Yoneyama, Cassandra Hugill, L. Quittenden, J. B. Reid
Published 2013 · Biology, Medicine

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New roles for the recently identified group of plant hormones, the strigolactones, are currently under active investigation. One of their key roles is to regulate plant symbioses. These compounds act as a rhizosphere signal in arbuscular mycorrhizal symbioses and as a positive regulator of nodulation in legumes. The phosphorous and nitrogen status of the soil has emerged as a powerful regulator of strigolactone production. However, until now, the potential role of strigolactones in regulating mycorrhizal development and nodulation in response to nutrient deficiency has not been proven. In this paper, the role of strigolactone synthesis and response in regulating these symbioses is examined in pea (Pisum sativum L.). Pea is well suited to this study, since there is a range of well-characterized strigolactone biosynthesis and response mutants that is unique amongst legumes. Evidence is provided for a novel endogenous role for strigolactone response within the root during mycorrhizal development, in addition to the action of strigolactones on the fungal partner. The strigolactone response pathway that regulates mycorrhizal development also appears to differ somewhat from the response pathway that regulates nodulation. Finally, studies with strigolactone-deficient pea mutants indicate that, despite strong regulation of strigolactone production by both nitrogen and phosphate, strigolactones are not required to regulate these symbioses in response to nutrient deficiency.
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