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Unhas Suture, A Novel Tendon Repair Technique: An In Vitro Experimental Study Comparing Unhas Suture And Bunnell Suture In Tensile Strength And Gap Formation

H. Yurianto, Ruksal Saleh, Idrus Paturusi, Wilhelmus Supriyadi, J. Lee
Published 2019 · Medicine

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Purpose: Developing a simple and yet strong repair technique that allows smooth gliding of the tendon within the tendon sheath has remained a challenge to meet the biomechanical needs of early active rehabilitation. Our Objective was to compare Unhas and Bunnell suture technique in terms of strength and gap resistance in tendon repair. Materials and Methods: Thirty feet of healthy roosters Gallus domesticus were harvested and assigned randomly into 2 groups of 15 feet each. The tendons were repaired using Unhas suture and Bunnell suture utilizing monofilament nylon 4-0. Every specimens were tested by using repaired tendon gap formation apparatus and then measured when it produced an initial gap and 2-mm gap at the repair site. The measurements were then analyzed for statistical significance. Results: Significant difference in initial gap was detected between repaired tendon using Unhas suture and Bunnell suture. Two-millimeter gap forces were tested and Unhas suture group was also significantly higher compared with Bunnell suture group. Conclusions: Unhas suture was proven to be able to resist gap forces either in initial gap or 2-mm gap compared with Bunnell suture Clinical Relevance: Unhas suture may be a reliable alternative in tendon repair that provides tensile strength, gapping resistance and also provide easiness which can be performed with conventional suture material and less operating time.
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