Online citations, reference lists, and bibliographies.
← Back to Search

Hurdles And Hopes For Cancer Treatment

K. Hunt, S. Vorburger
Published 2002 · Medicine

Cite This
Download PDF
Analyze on Scholarcy
Share
Remarkable progress has been achieved in the field of gene therapy over the past decade. The initial excitement in this young field has led to the development of more than 500 gene therapy protocols approved for evaluation in clinical trials. As these clinical trials progress, many obstacles have been identified that investigators in the field will need to overcome. Among the most important areas of investigation in the field of cancer gene therapy are 1) development of novel vectors to improve gene delivery, 2) development of tumor-selective binding to improve specific tumor targeting, and 3) improvement of the therapeutic window to reduce the toxicity of gene therapy administered alone or in combination with conventional agents. The challenge is not to replace current strategies for cancer therapy with gene therapy but to incorporate gene therapy as a more rational, molecularly based approach to increase our therapeutic armamentarium.



This paper is referenced by
10.1016/j.nano.2008.02.001
N-hexanoyl chitosan-stabilized magnetic nanoparticles: enhancement of adenoviral-mediated gene expression both in vitro and in vivo.
S. Bhattarai (2008)
10.1021/bc9004624
Novel cationic lipids based on malonic acid amides backbone: transfection efficacy and cell toxicity properties.
Martin Heinze (2010)
10.1007/978-3-319-41129-3_2
Nanoparticles Types, Classification, Characterization, Fabrication Methods and Drug Delivery Applications
Saurabh Bhatia (2016)
10.1038/sj.cgt.7700967
Oncolytic adenovirus-mediated transfer of the antisense chk2 selectively inhibits tumor growth in vitro and in vivo
G. Chen (2006)
Chimpanzees and Medical Research
R. Greek (2005)
10.1016/J.JCONREL.2007.08.022
Lipoplex morphologies and their influences on transfection efficiency in gene delivery.
B. Ma (2007)
10.1038/sj.cgt.7700730
Tumor-specific intravenous gene delivery using oncolytic adenoviruses
J. Zhan (2005)
Tumor-targeting of viral vectors for cancer gene therapy by using antibodies or their genes against tumor-associated antigens.
M. Kuroki (2004)
10.1016/J.BBRC.2005.10.112
Improved gene expression in resting macrophages using an oligopeptide derived from Vpr of human immunodeficiency virus type-1.
Izuru Mizoguchi (2005)
10.1016/j.bmcl.2014.02.034
TACN-based cationic lipids with amino acid backbone and double tails: materials for non-viral gene delivery.
Bing Wang (2014)
10.1021/acsami.6b01561
Low Molecular Weight Oligomers with Aromatic Backbone as Efficient Nonviral Gene Vectors.
Chao-Ran Luan (2016)
10.1017/cbo9780511807411
Genetics and Christian Ethics
C. Deane‐Drummond (2005)
10.1038/cgt.2014.67
An armed, YB-1-dependent oncolytic adenovirus as a candidate for a combinatorial anti-glioma approach of virotherapy, suicide gene therapy and chemotherapeutic treatment
Y. Kostova (2014)
A Scientific Case for the Elimination of Chimpanzees in Research
R. Greek (2005)
10.1016/j.actbio.2011.04.023
Comparison of ethanolamine/ethylenediamine-functionalized poly(glycidyl methacrylate) for efficient gene delivery.
Fu-Jian Xu (2011)
GENETIC RE-TARGETING AND DE-TARGETING OF ADENOVIRUS TYPE 5 IN ORDER TO CREATE VECTORS FOR GENE THERAPY
S. Myhre (2007)
10.1038/gt.2008.160
Re-targeted adenovirus vectors with dual specificity; binding specificities conferred by two different Affibody molecules in the fiber
S. Myhre (2009)
10.1016/j.addr.2015.10.014
Co-delivery of drugs and plasmid DNA for cancer therapy.
Pei Yun Teo (2016)
10.1021/am506730t
Poly(aspartic acid)-based degradable assemblies for highly efficient gene delivery.
Jing-Jun Nie (2015)
Synthesis and Evaluation of Tween 85-LPEI Copolymers for Gene Transfection In vitro and In vivo
Mingxing Wang (2014)
10.1021/acs.bioconjchem.5b00357
Tuning Surface Charge and PEGylation of Biocompatible Polymers for Efficient Delivery of Nucleic Acid or Adenoviral Vector.
Joung-Woo Choi (2015)
10.3390/POLYM7111516
Amino Acid-Modified Polyethylenimines with Enhanced Gene Delivery Efficiency and Biocompatibility
Qin-fang Zhang (2015)
10.1038/sj.gt.3302760
Enhanced local delivery with reduced systemic toxicity: Delivery, delivery, and delivery
P. Yu (2006)
10.1157/13078997
Especies reactivas de oxígeno en las enfermedades inflamatorias del páncreas : ¿una posible diana terapéutica?
E. C. Vaquero-Raya (2005)
10.1517/14712598.3.3.477
Therapeutic vaccination for the treatment of mucosotropic human papillomavirus-associated disease
N. Chu (2003)
10.1038/cgt.2009.52
Viruses, gene therapy and stem cells for the treatment of human glioma
AP Kyritsis (2009)
10.1016/j.biomaterials.2008.03.041
Pentablock copolymers of poly(ethylene glycol), poly((2-dimethyl amino)ethyl methacrylate) and poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) from consecutive atom transfer radical polymerizations for non-viral gene delivery.
F. Xu (2008)
10.1177/0885328212440345
Functional study of dextran-graft-poly((2-dimethyl amino)ethyl methacrylate) gene delivery vector for tumor therapy
W. Li (2013)
10.1016/j.biotechadv.2011.03.003
Can non-viral technologies knockdown the barriers to siRNA delivery and achieve the next generation of cancer therapeutics?
Jianfeng Guo (2011)
Possible applications of antibodies or their genes in cancer therapy.
M. Kuroki (2006)
10.1016/j.biomaterials.2013.12.017
Different types of degradable vectors from low-molecular-weight polycation-functionalized poly(aspartic acid) for efficient gene delivery.
X. Dou (2014)
10.1039/C6TB03311C
A combinatorial library of triazine-cored polymeric vectors for pDNA delivery in vitro and in vivo.
Mingxing Wang (2017)
See more
Semantic Scholar Logo Some data provided by SemanticScholar