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Modulation Of The Inspiratory-Related Activity Of Hypoglossal Premotor Neurons During Ingestion And Rejection In The Decerebrate Cat

Takashi Ono, Yasuo Ishiwata, Noritaka Inaba, Takayuki Kuroda, Yoshio Nakamura

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Ono, Takashi, Yasuo Ishiwata, Noritaka Inaba, Takayuki Kuroda, and Yoshio Nakamura. Modulation of the inspiratory-related activity of hypoglossal premotor neurons during ingestion and rejection in the decerebrate cat. J. Neurophysiol. 80: 48–58, 1998. Single-unit activities of the bulbar reticular inspiratory neurons directly projecting to hypoglossal motoneurons were studied during fictive ingestion (e.g., swallowing) and rejection elicited by repetitive stimulation of the superior laryngeal nerve and by application of water to the pharynx in immobilized decerebrated cats. The single-unit activity was recorded during 113 episodes of fictive ingestion from 25 inspiratory neurons directly projecting to hypoglossal motoneurons (single projection neurons) and 7 inspiratory neurons directly projecting to both hypoglossal and phrenic motoneurons (dual projection neurons) in the regions ventrolateral to the nucleus tractus solitarii and dorsomedial to the nucleus ambiguus. All of single projection neurons ceased inspiratory-related rhythmical discharges coincidentally with the onset of repetitive stimulation of the superior laryngeal nerve. The majority of them (19/25, 76%, type A) showed a spike burst during ingestion, whereas the minority (6/25, 24%, type B) kept silent until the end of repetitive stimulation of the superior laryngeal nerve. During fictive ingestion elicited by application of water to the pharynx, the type-A neurons showed a spike burst activity, whereas the type-B neurons kept silent. All dual projection neurons (7/7, 100%, type C) ceased inspiratory-related rhythmical discharges at the onset of repetitive stimulation of the superior laryngeal nerve and showed no activity during fictive ingestion. Likewise, the type-C neurons kept silent during fictive ingestion elicited by application of water to the pharynx. A spike burst was induced during 33 episodes of fictive rejection in all of 5 tested type-A, 3 tested type-B, and 6 tested type-C neurons. It is concluded that the premotor neurons involved in the respiratory-related rhythmical activity of hypoglossal motoneurons is responsible for switching from respiration to ingestion and rejection.