Online citations, reference lists, and bibliographies.
← Back to Search

Laryngeal Behavior In Unilateral Superior Laryngeal Nerve Paralysis

S. Tanaka, M. Hirano, H. Umeno
Published 1994 · Medicine

Cite This
Download PDF
Analyze on Scholarcy
Share
Laryngeal behavior in unilateral superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) paralysis was investigated in animal models and clinical cases. The occurrence of an oblique glottis caused by rotation of the posterior glottis to the paralytic side was the main focus of this study. The animal model study employed live dogs. When the SLN on one side was sectioned, spontaneous phonation did not cause a significantly oblique glottis. When the unaffected SLN was electrically stimulated during spontaneous phonation, an oblique glottis occurred. When the SLN was unilaterally stimulated during spontaneous phonation with both SLNs sectioned, a markedly oblique glottis occurred. In the clinical study, larynges of 17 patients with SLN paralysis were examined during a test task in which a low-pitched phonation was followed by a high-pitched phonation. The purpose of this task was to activate the unaffected cricothyroid muscle during the test phonation. Five patients could not perform the test task. The glottis obviously rotated in 9 patients, whereas no significant rotation of the glottis occurred in 3. One of the latter 3 had an incomplete paralysis, and the other 2 had marked scarring around the laryngeal framework. We conclude that a unilateral SLN paralysis causes a rotation of the posterior glottis to the paralytic side when the unaffected cricothyroid muscle is markedly activated. The test consisting of low-pitched phonation followed by high-pitched phonation is a relatively simple and accurate diagnostic procedure for unilateral SLN paralysis.
This paper references
10.1017/S0022215100108412
Cricothyroid muscle paralysis: its recognition and diagnosis.
K. Bevan (1989)
Traumatic paralysis ofthe cricothyroid muscle
BeyerTE (1940)
Avoiding injury to the extralaryngeal nerves.
R. L. Gregg (1957)
Laryngeal fmdings in superior laryngeal nerveparalysis: a controversy
Abelson Tl (1981)
10.1288/00005537-197010000-00001
The paralyzed larynx: An electromyographic study in dogs and humans
H. Dedo (1970)
Die Paralyse des M . Cricothyreoideus
H Mygind (1906)
10.1002/BJS.1800700619
Cranial and cervical nerve damage associated with carotid endarterectomy
T. Dehn (1983)
10.1177/019459988108900322
Laryngeal Findings in Superior Laryngeal Nerve Paralysis: A Controversy
T. Abelson (1981)
10.1177/000348945706600305
XLIX Avoiding Injury to the Extralaryngeal Nerves
Ralph L. Gregg (1957)
10.3109/00016486809120939
Movements of the vocal cords.
S. Takenouchi (1968)
TakenouchiS . KoyamaT . KawasakiM . OguraJH . Movements ofthe vocal cords
Abelson Tl (1968)
Experimental laryngeal paralysis
RL Gregg (1956)
10.3109/00016486409136955
UNILATERAL PARALYSIS OF THE SUPERIOR LARYNGEAL NERVE.
K. Faaborg-Andersen (1964)
Superior laryngeal nerve paralysis an often overlooked entity.
P. Ward (1977)
10.1288/00005537-196107000-00002
Physiology and pathology of the cricothyroid muscle
G. Arnold (1961)
Munk Jensen A . Unilateral paralysis of the superior laryngeal nerve
K Faaborg-Andersen (1964)
10.1002/LARY.5540510311
Traumatic paralysis of the cricothyroid muscle
T. Beyer (1941)



This paper is referenced by
10.1201/B10837-10
Animal Models for Otolaryngological Disorders
M. Wadie (2011)
10.1002/lary.20143
Exploring the phonatory effects of external superior laryngeal nerve paralysis: An In vivo model
N. Roy (2009)
10.1002/lary.20193
An in vivo model of external superior laryngeal nerve paralysis
N. Roy (2009)
10.1002/lary.26409
Neuromuscular compensation mechanisms in vocal fold paralysis and paresis
Karuna Dewan (2017)
10.1016/S0892-1997(96)80048-8
Superior laryngeal nerve paresis and paralysis.
G. Dursun (1996)
10.1097/MOO.0b013e3283452247
Denervation of the external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve: laryngeal and phonatory features
N. Roy (2011)
10.1016/S0196-0709(98)90060-6
Aspiration in unilateral recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis after surgery.
S. Périé (1998)
10.1016/j.otohns.2006.05.023
Vibratory pattern of vocal folds under tension asymmetry
R. Maunsell (2006)
10.1016/S0892-1997(98)80024-6
Voice range in superior laryngeal nerve paresis and paralysis.
C. Eckley (1998)
10.1177/000348949410300504
Some Aspects of Vocal Fold Bowing
S. Tanaka (1994)
10.1177/014556130007901109
Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve Paralysis: Current Concepts and Treatment: Part I-Phylogenesis and Physiology
D. Hartl (2000)
10.1016/J.JVOICE.2005.04.001
Objective voice measures in nonsinging patients with unilateral superior laryngeal nerve paresis.
J. Robinson (2005)
10.1016/j.jvoice.2016.08.018
Impact of Cricothyroid Muscle Contraction on Vocal Fold Vibration: Experimental Study with High-Speed Videoendoscopy.
Camila Cristina Ishikawa (2017)
10.1016/S0030-6665(02)00129-9
Complications of thyroid and parathyroid surgery.
J. Fewins (2003)
10.3109/00016489509139317
Mechanism of glottic closure in a model of unilateral vocal fold palsy.
M. Riad (1995)
10.1016/J.OTC.2007.05.012
Vocal fold paresis and paralysis.
A. Rubin (2007)
10.1016/S0030-6665(03)00175-0
The superior laryngeal nerve: function and dysfunction.
L. Sulica (2004)
10.1002/lary.24301
External branch of the superior laryngeal nerve monitoring during thyroid and parathyroid surgery: International Neural Monitoring Study Group standards guideline statement
M. Barczyński (2013)
10.1177/000348941112000101
Laryngeal Features of External Superior Laryngeal Nerve Denervation: Revisiting a Century-Old Controversy
N. Roy (2011)
10.1016/S0892-1997(98)80023-4
Unilateral cricothyroid contraction and glottic configuration.
G. Woodson (1998)
10.1002/lary.24446
Superior laryngeal nerve quantitative intraoperative monitoring is possible in all thyroid surgeries
E. Darr (2014)
10.1016/S0892-1997(00)80100-9
Combination thyroplasty and the "twisted larynx:" combined type IV and type I thyroplasty for superior laryngeal nerve weakness.
S. Nasseri (2000)
10.1177/000348940711600202
Strobokymographic and Videostroboscopic Analysis of Vocal Fold Motion in Unilateral Superior Laryngeal Nerve Paralysis
Abie H. Mendelsohn (2007)
10.1002/(SICI)1097-4598(199804)21:4<552::AID-MUS23>3.0.CO;2-Y
The value of laryngeal electromyography in vocal cord paralysis
F. Elez (1998)
10.1121/1.1430686
On the influence of laryngeal pathologies on acoustic and electroglottographic jitter measures.
M. Vieira (2002)
10.13064/KSSS.2012.4.1.125
Comparison of Maximum Phonation Time Associated with the Changes in Vocal Intensity in Patients with Unilateral Vocal Fold Palsy and Sulcus Vocalis
Se-Jin Choi (2012)
10.1016/j.bjorl.2019.04.005
Difficulty producing high-pitched sounds in singing: correlations with laryngostroboscopy and electromyographic findings.
G. P. Korn (2019)
10.21037/gs.2017.06.15
Injury of the external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve in thyroid surgery.
A. Potenza (2017)
10.1007/s00405-012-2053-0
The posterior glottis: structural and clinical considerations
M. Kotby (2012)
10.1007/978-3-319-27727-1_1
Rates of RLN and SLN Injury: Data from National Quality Registries and the Literature
N. Tolley (2016)
Automated measures of dysphonias and the phonatory effects of asymmetries in the posterior larynx
M. N. Vieira (1997)
10.1002/lary.27414
Isolated Paresis of Laryngeal Adduction: What Are the Laryngoscopic and Stroboscopic Findings?
R. Imamura (2019)
See more
Semantic Scholar Logo Some data provided by SemanticScholar