Online citations, reference lists, and bibliographies.
Please confirm you are human
(Sign Up for free to never see this)
← Back to Search

Switchgrass Biomass Production In The Midwest USA: Harvest And Nitrogen Management.

K. Vogel, J. Brejda, D. T. Walters, D. R. Buxton
Published 2002 · Biology

Save to my Library
Download PDF
Analyze on Scholarcy
Share
Information on optimal harvest periods and N fertilization rates for switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) grown as a biomass or bioenergy crop in the Midwest USA is limited. Our objectives were to determine optimum harvest periods and N rates for biomass production in the region. Established stands of Cave-in-Rock' switchgrass at Ames, IA, and Mead, NE, were fertilized 0, 60, 120, 180, 240, or 300 kg N ha -1 . Harvest treatments were two- or one-cut treatments per year, with initial harvest starting in late June or early July (Harvest 1) and continuing at approximately 7-d intervals until the latter part of August (Harvest 7). A final eighth harvest was completed after a killing frost. Regrowth was harvested on previously harvested plots at that time. Soil samples were taken before fertilizer was applied in the spring of 1994 and again in the spring of 1996. Averaged over years, optimum biomass yields were obtained when switchgrass was harvested at the maturity stages R3 to R5 (panicle fully emerged from boot to postanthesis) and fertilized with 120 kg N ha -1 . Biomass yields with these treatments averaged 10.5 to 11.2 Mg ha -1 at Mead and 11.6 to 12.6 Mg ha -1 at Ames. At this fertility level, the amount of N removed was approximately the same as the amount applied. At rates above this level, soil NO 3 -N concentrations increased.
This paper references
10.1016/0304-3746(75)90007-4
Big bluestem and indiangrass vegetative reproduction and annual reserve carbohydrate and nitrogen cycles
J. D. McKendrick (1975)
10.2134/AGRONJ1998.00021962009000060006X
Evaluation of Switchgrass Rhizosphere Microflora for Enhancing Seedling Yield and Nutrient Uptake
J. Brejda (1998)
SAS / STAT user ’ s guide . Version 6 . 4 th ed . SAS Inst . , Cary , NC .
E. R. Beaty (1990)
10.2307/1935084
Internal Cycling of Nitrogen in Shortgrass Prairie
F. Clark (1977)
10.2307/3897409
Response of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) to clipping frequency
E. Beaty (1976)
A Simple Method of Converting Rangeland Drills to Experimental Plot
D. William (1998)
10.2134/AGRONJ1991.00021962008300060027X
Describing and Quantifying Growth Stages of Perennial Forage Grasses
K. Moore (1991)
10.2307/4003280
Residual nitrogen effects on soil, forage, and steer gain.
W. Berg (2000)
10.2134/AGRONJ1999.00021962009100010002X
Harvest management of switchgrass for biomass feedstock and forage production.
M. Sanderson (1999)
10.2134/AGRONJ1997.00021962008900050018X
Predicting Developmental Morphology in Switchgrass and Big Bluestem
R. Mitchell (1997)
10.1016/S0961-9534(00)00042-8
Nitrogen removal in switchgrass biomass under two harvest systems
J. H. Reynolds (2000)
10.2134/AGRONJ2001.934896X
Biomass Production of ‘Alamo’ Switchgrass in Response to Nitrogen, Phosphorus, and Row Spacing
J. P. Muir (2001)
Energy production from forages (or American agriculture-back to the future)
K. Vogel (1996)
10.2307/3897187
A simple method of converting rangeland drills to experimental plot seeders
K. Vogel (1978)
SAS/STAT user’s guide
SAS Institute. (1990)
virgatum L.) to clipping frequency
R.G.D. Steel (1980)
10.2134/AGRONJ1989.00021962008100010008X
Spring Defoliation to Improve Summer Supply and Quality of Switchgrass
J. R. George (1989)
Residual nitrogen effects on soil , statistics , 2 nd ed . McGraw - Hill , New York . forage , and steer gains
K. P. Vogel (2000)
10.1017/S0889189300004665
Biomass as an energy source for the midwestern U.S.
D. Keeney (1992)



This paper is referenced by
10.1016/J.BIOMBIOE.2005.10.008
Switchgrass production for the upper southeastern USA: Influence of cultivar and cutting frequency on biomass yields
J. Fike (2006)
10.1111/gcbb.12388
Mapping marginal croplands suitable for cellulosic feedstock crops in the Great Plains, United States
Y. Gu (2017)
10.2134/AGE2019.02.0010
Switchgrass Forage Yield and Compositional Response to Phosphorus and Potassium
A. Ashworth (2019)
10.1111/j.1757-1707.2011.01099.x
Field‐scale soil property changes under switchgrass managed for bioenergy
M. Schmer (2011)
Influence of herbaceous biomass crops on soil organic carbon in southern Ontario soils
Jordan Graham (2018)
10.1007/s10295-007-0296-3
Opportunities and roadblocks in utilizing forages and small grains for liquid fuels
G. Sarath (2007)
10.2135/CROPSCI2006.06.0406
Potential for enhanced nutrient cycling through coupling of agricultural and bioenergy systems
R. Anex (2007)
Switchgrass for Forage and Bioenergy: II. Effects of P and K fertilization
John A. Guretzky (2009)
10.1016/J.BIOMBIOE.2004.11.001
Grassland bird response to harvesting switchgrass as a biomass energy crop
Amber M. Roth (2005)
10.1016/J.BIORTECH.2006.04.027
Switchgrass (Panicum vigratum, L.) delivery to a biorefinery using integrated biomass supply analysis and logistics (IBSAL) model.
A. Kumar (2007)
10.1016/J.BIOMBIOE.2015.02.029
Simulated biomass, environmental impacts and best management practices for long-term switchgrass systems in a semi-arid region
Limei Wang (2015)
10.7282/T3SX6BG7
Evaluation of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) as a bioenergy feedstock for the Northeastern and Mid-Atlantic USA
Laura M. Cortese (2014)
Optimizing Harvest Logistics Of Perennial Grasses Used For Biofuel
(2013)
10.1080/01904167.2017.1346669
Switchgrass forage yield and biofuel quality with no-tillage interseeded winter legumes in the southern Great Plains
Apurba K. Sutradhar (2017)
10.5333/KGFS.2011.31.1.1
Factors Influencing Efficient Agrobacterium-mediated Transformation of Panicum spp.
Mi-suk Seo (2011)
10.1016/J.BIOMBIOE.2008.08.014
Yield and canopy characteristics of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) as influenced by cutting management
Zs. Kiss Trócsányi (2009)
10.1111/gcbb.12444
Switchgrass nitrogen response and estimated production costs on diverse sites
John H. Fike (2017)
10.1016/J.WASMAN.2007.09.023
Crop residues as soil amendments and feedstock for bioethanol production.
R. Lal (2008)
10.2136/2011.soilmanagement.c24
Soil Management Implicationsof Producing Biofuel Feedstock
J. Johnson (2011)
Development of Fertilizer Recommendations for Native Biofuel Crops and Nutrient Release from Cattle Feces
R. Brown (2010)
10.1016/J.FORECO.2013.04.016
Optimal nitrogen application rates for three intensively-managed hardwood tree species in the southeastern USA
D. Coyle (2013)
10.1002/9781118635797.CH9
Nutrient Management in Biofuel Crop Production
R. Lemus (2013)
10.2135/CROPSCI2016.07.0582
Nitrogen Fertilizer Application Effects on Switchgrass Herbage Mass, Nutritive Value and Nutrient Removal
A. Obour (2017)
Proficient physiognomies and herbage of blue panic grass (Panicum Antidotale ) at variable clipping intensities
M. Habib (2015)
BIOCHEMICAL, PHYSIOLOGICAL, AND ANATOMICAL INSIGHTS INTO APHID-BIOENERGY SWITCHGRASS INTERACTIONS
T. Prochaska (2015)
10.1016/J.INDCROP.2013.03.029
Nitrogen fertility and harvest management of switchgrass for sustainable bioenergy feedstock production in Illinois
E. Anderson (2013)
10.2134/AGRONJ2013.0410
Maximizing Land Use during Switchgrass Establishment in the North Central United States
J. L. Hedtcke (2014)
10.15376/BIORES.11.3.7102-7123
Sustainability Protocols and Certification Criteria for Switchgrass-Based Bioenergy
P. Burli (2016)
10.2172/929781
Historical Perspective on How and Why Switchgrass was Selected as a "Model" High-Potential Energy Crop
L. L. Wright (2007)
10.1016/J.AGSY.2006.06.001
Evaluating warm-season grass production in temperate-region pastures: A simulation approach
Michael S. Corson (2007)
10.31274/ETD-180810-1226
Essays concerning the cellulosic biofuel industry
Alicia Rosburg (2012)
10.2134/AGRONJ2017.04.0196
Biomass Yield of Warm‐Season Grasses Affected by Nitrogen and Harvest Management
Chamara Weerasekara (2018)
See more
Semantic Scholar Logo Some data provided by SemanticScholar