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Progressive Supranuclear Palsy: Clinical Features And Response To Treatment In 16 Patients

J. A. Jackson, J. Jankovic, J. Ford
Published 1983 · Medicine

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Among 415 patients with parkinsonism, 16 (3.9%) had findings of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). This report reviews the clinical features and response to drug therapy in those 16 patients. Anticholinergic drugs failed to benefit any of the 5 patients treated, while presynaptic dopaminergic drugs (Sinemet or amantadine) were beneficial in only 5 of 22 patient trials. Alternatively, dopamine agonists (bromocriptine and pergolide) caused improvement in 9 of 14 patient trials despite the fact that all but 1 of these patients had previously failed to respond to presynaptic dopaminergic drugs. Dopamine agonists such as bromocriptine and pergolide may be useful in some patients with PSP.
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