Online citations, reference lists, and bibliographies.

Measures Of Body Size And Growth In Rhesus And Squirrel Monkeys Subjected To Long-term Dietary Restriction.

Richard Weindruch, Bernadette M. Marriott, Joan M. Conway, Joseph J. Knapka, Mark A. Lane, Richard G. Cutler, George S. Roth, Donald K. Ingram
Published 1995 · Medicine, Biology
Cite This
Download PDF
Analyze on Scholarcy
Share
Although many studies have reported the robust effects of dietary restriction (DR) in retarding numerous aging processes in rodents, little is known about the outcomes of reducing caloric intake of a nutritious diet on aging in primates. Most primate studies have concerned the effects of malnutrition. We hypothesized that DR influences aging processes in primate species as it does in rodents. In the present study, 24 male rhesus (Macaca mulatta) monkeys (ages 0.6-5 years) and 25 male squirrel (Saimiri sp.) monkeys (ages 0.3-10 years) were provided diets formulated differently for each species but both fortified with vitamins and minerals (40% above recommended levels) as controls (approximating ad libitum levels) or experimentals (about 30% below the level of diet provided controls of comparable age and body weight). The results reported here concern the hypothesis that DR imposed during various developmental stages in these two primate species would affect morphometric parameters obtained at different occasions during the first 5 years of the study. Groups of older monkeys (rhesus: 18-25 years, n = 3; squirrel: 10-15 years, n = 4) were also included as controls for comparative purposes. Among groups of rhesus monkeys begun on DR prior to 6 years of age, growth in body weight and crown-rump length was reduced about 10-20% beginning after 1 year on the diet, with estimated food intake being reduced about 30-35% over this period. Measures of skin-fold thickness and various body circumference measures were also reduced in experimental groups of rhesus monkeys. In contrast, the DR regimen involving a different diet produced little impact on comparable measures in squirrel monkeys, with the estimated food intake being reduced only about 20-25% over this period. However evidence of divergence in some morphometric parameters in squirrel monkeys was beginning to emerge in young groups (<5 years(after 3 yers on the diet. © 1995 Wiley-Liss, Inc.



This paper is referenced by
10.1023/A:1026363206561
Sexual Maturation of Female Japanese Macaques Under Poor Nutritional Conditions and Food-Enhanced Perineal Swelling in the Koshima Troop
Akio Mori (2004)
Calorie and protein restriction in mammals : a review and comparison on respect to aging
Johan Noraker Nossen (2016)
10.1007/978-3-642-59916-3
Studies of Aging
Hal Sternberg (1999)
10.1101/113027
How to get the most bang for your buck: the evolution and physiology of nutrition-dependent resource allocation strategies
Enoch Ng'oma (2017)
10.1093/ilar.52.1.78
The development of small primate models for aging research.
Kathleen Elizabeth Fischer (2011)
10.1161/CIRCRESAHA.116.307473
Dietary Interventions, Cardiovascular Aging, and Disease: Animal Models and Human Studies.
Hamed Mirzaei (2016)
General characteristics of rhesus macaques used in long-term aging studies
Clive McCay (2011)
10.1093/gerona/51A.6.B387
The evolution of the antiaging action of dietary restriction: a hypothesis.
Edward J. Masoro (1996)
10.1093/gerona/55.8.B373
Locomotor activity in female rhesus monkeys: assessment of age and calorie restriction effects.
Tammy D Moscrip (2000)
10.1093/ilar.52.1.66
Calorie restriction and aging in nonhuman primates.
Joseph W. Kemnitz (2011)
10.1038/s41437-018-0154-2
The evolutionary potential of diet-dependent effects on lifespan and fecundity in a multi-parental population of Drosophila melanogaster
Enoch Ng'oma (2018)
10.1177/0300985813492801
Models and Strategies in the Development of Antiobesity Drugs
A. Agahi (2014)
10.1023/A:1026084420943
Dietary calorie restriction, DNA-repair and brain aging
Kalluri Subba Rao (2004)
10.1006/jtbi.2001.2431
Complex adaptive systems, aging and longevity.
Marc Mangel (2001)
10.1101/343947
The evolutionary potential of diet-dependent effects on lifespan and fecundity in a multi-parental population of Drosophila melanogaster
Enoch Ng’oma (2018)
10.1098/rspb.2017.0445
How to get the most bang for your buck: the evolution and physiology of nutrition-dependent resource allocation strategies
Enoch Ng'oma (2017)
Semantic Scholar Logo Some data provided by SemanticScholar