Online citations, reference lists, and bibliographies.
← Back to Search

The Future Of Academic Publishing: Revolution Or Evolution?

Francis Dodds
Published 2018 · Computer Science, Sociology

Save to my Library
Download PDF
Analyze on Scholarcy Visualize in Litmaps
Share
Reduce the time it takes to create your bibliography by a factor of 10 by using the world’s favourite reference manager
Time to take this seriously.
Get Citationsy
Key points Concerns about a crisis in monograph publishing date back to at least the 1990s, and for traditional journal publishing at least a decade. Two key trends behind concerns over book and journal models are pressures on funding and the emergence of open access. Despite predictions of a revolution, the academic publishing sector has proved remarkably resilient in adapting to market changes. Whilst showing some support for ‘open science’, even early career researchers remain committed to traditional publishing models. The growth in scholarly collaboration networks and in sharing across traditional boundaries is the more likely disrupter of traditional publishing.
This paper references
Conference: The specialist monograph in crisis
Anonymous. (1997)
Putting the customer first.
C. Hendricks (2003)
10.1108/02641619510635696
Books in the Digital Age: The Transformation of Academic and Higher Education Publishing in Britain and the United States
M. Line (2005)
Nature's Peer Review Debate
S. Greaves (2006)
10.3998/3336451.0011.201
Scholarly monograph publishing in the 21st century: The future more than ever should be an open book
Colin Steele (2008)
Scholarly monograph publishing in the twenty-first century: The future more than ever is an open book
C. Steele (2008)
An overview of scientific, technical and medical publishing and the value it adds to research outputs
STM. (2008)
Monograph output of American University Presses
J Esposito (2009)
10.1016/B978-1-84334-669-2.50002-0
Peer review in a rapidly evolving publishing landscape
Irene Hames (2012)
Open Access Survey - The Summary : Survey of Academic Attitudes towards Open Access and Institutional Repositories
Marja-Leena Harjuniemi (2012)
10.1629/2048-7754.25.2.192
A snapshot of attitudes towards open access monograph publishing in the humanities and social sciences – part of the OAPEN-UK project
E. Collins (2012)
Early Career Researchers
K. Speaker) (2012)
10.1016/B978-1-84334-669-2.50017-2
Does journal publishing have a future
Michael Mabe (2012)
10.1038/512126A
Online collaboration: Scientists and the social network
R. V. Noorden (2014)
10.6084/m9.figshare.951966.v2
Developing an effective market for Open Access Article Processing Charges
Kiley Robert (2014)
10.1108/OIR-07-2015-0229
Open Access and the Humanities: Contexts, Controversies and the Future
D. Stuart (2015)
10.5920/OAPEN-UK/OAGUIDE
Guide to open access monograph publishing for arts, humanities and social science researchers
E. Collins (2015)
10.1087/20150306
Understanding end‐users in academic book publishing
Francis Dodds (2015)
10.1002/asi.23329
Growth rates of modern science: A bibliometric analysis based on the number of publications and cited references
L. Bornmann (2014)
10.1087/20150106
Changes in the role of the commissioning editor in academic book publishing
Francis Dodds (2015)
Library and Information Statistics Unit (LISU) joint database with the Society of College, National and University Libraries (SCONUL)
Library (2015)
Elsevier leads the business the internet could not kill
G. Crossick (2015)
Library and Information Statistics Unit (LISU) joint database with the Society of College
(2015)
Monographs and open access: A report to the HEFCE
G. Crossick (2015)
STM consultation on article sharing
STM. (2015)
The STM report: An overview of scientific and scholarly journal publishing. The Hague, The Netherlands: STM
M. Ware (2015)
2015, 15 November). Elsevier leads the business the internet could not kill
R. Cookson (2015)
10.1002/asi.23446
The “total cost of publication” in a hybrid open‐access environment: Institutional approaches to funding journal article‐processing charges in combination with subscriptions
S. Pinfield (2016)
10.1002/leap.1049
New university presses in the UK: Accessing a mission
A. Lockett (2016)
10.3233/ISU-160800
How readers discover content in scholarly publications
(2016)
Wellcome to launch bold new publishing initiative
Wellcome. (2016)
August/September). Open access: At what cost
R. Pool (2016)
June/July). Lagging behind and striving ahead: The US scholarly publishing market
P. Jones (2016)
June/July). High five! Common trends across the scholarly landscape in Europe and North America
D. Baja (2016)
Academic library book purchasing trends [White paper
ProQuest. (2016)
Academic library book purchasing trends
Proquest (2016)
OAPEN-UK final report: A five-year study into open access monograph publishing in the humanities and social sciences
E. Collins (2016)
Author! Author! It’s all about author-ity! [Web log post
D. Worlock (2016)
Towards open research: Practices, experiences, barriers and opportunities
V. Van den Eynden (2016)
2016, 24 March). Article sharing on scholarly collaboration networks [Web log post
F. Dylla (2016)
Open Access: At What Cost?
V. Scaria (2017)
10.1038/nature.2017.21700
Gates Foundation announces open-access publishing venture
Declan Butler (2017)
The Forbidden Forecast: Thinking About Open Access and Library Subscriptions
L. Gonzales (2017)
10.5281/ZENODO.546100
Untangling academic publishing: a history of the relationship between commercial interests, academic prestige and the circulation of research
Aileen Fyfe (2017)
10.1007/s11192-017-2291-4
Copyright compliance and infringement in ResearchGate full-text journal articles
M. HamidR.Jamali (2017)
2017, 7 April). The scale and nature of researchers’ use of scholarly collaboration networks [Web log post
C. Rapple (2017)
February/March). Independent publishing: Breaking the mould? Research Information
D. Berze (2017)
Open access guidance
Wellcome. (2017)
Bloomsbury academic open access statement
Bloomsbury Publishing. (2017)
2017a, 21 February). The forbidden forecast: Thinking about open access and library subscriptions [Web log post
R. Anderson (2017)
2017b, 1 May). When the wolf finally arrives: Big deal cancellations in North American libraries [Web log post
R. Anderson (2017)
2017, 4 February). Monograph output of American University Presses 2009–2013 [Web log post
J. Esposito (2017)
February/March). Take-off for OA books
S. Fund (2017)
Towards a competitive and sustainable open access publishing market in Europe: A study prepared for the OpenAIRE 2020 project on behalf of the European Commission
R. Johnson (2017)
Article sharing on scholarly collaboration networks
F Dylla
The scale and nature of researchers' use of scholarly collaboration networks
C Rapple
Take-off for OA books
S Fund
Independent publishing: Breaking the mould
D Berze
Lagging behind and striving ahead: The US scholarly publishing market
P Jones
Open access articles grow at twice the rate of all published research
Stm
Open access: Six myths to put to rest
P Suber
When the wolf finally arrives: Big deal cancellations in North American libraries
R Anderson
Elsevier leads the business the internet could not kill. Financial Times
R Cookson
Author! Author! It's all about author-ity!
D Worlock
The Harbottle and Lewis independent publishing report
High five! Common trends across the scholarly landscape in Europe and North America
D Baja
AAP reports publisher print sales up, ebook sales down 18.9% through



This paper is referenced by
Semantic Scholar Logo Some data provided by SemanticScholar