Online citations, reference lists, and bibliographies.

Seeking An Innovation Structure Common To Both Manufacturing And Services

Rafael Guillermo García Cáceres, Joaquín Guzmán
Published 2015 · Economics

Cite This
Download PDF
Analyze on Scholarcy
Share
AbstractIn accordance with the numerous researchers who have stated the need for an integrated and holistic theory of innovation, this article attempts to determine similarities between the processes of innovation in services and manufacturing that support the integrative approach to innovation. The analysis provides a structure of innovative activities carried out by firms, which is common to both manufacturing and services using data from the Community Innovation Survey 4 (CIS-4). The empirical analysis applies an innovative methodology based on calculating conditional probabilities to measure the level of complementarity between different innovative activities. Results show that a structure consisting of complementary innovative activities carried out by firms is clearly discernible in the high-tech manufacturing sector and prevails in the remaining sectors despite a reduction in intensity as the level of technology decreases.
This paper references
10.1016/S0737-6782(01)00070-4
Creating a platform-based approach for developing new services
M. Meyer (2001)
10.1016/S0166-4972(03)00082-8
Patterns of innovation and skills in small firms
M. Freel (2005)
10.1007/S11628-007-0026-Y
Services, growth poles and advanced economies
D. McKee (2008)
10.4337/9781849803304
The Handbook of Innovation and Services
Faïz Gallouj (2010)
10.1007/S11628-006-0015-6
What do we really know about services?
G. Akehurst (2008)
10.1108/09564230310474138
Managing the transition from products to services
Rogelio Oliva (2003)
10.1007/s11628-009-0073-7
Systematic performance differences across the manufacturing-service continuum
Richard Reed (2009)
10.1108/09604520510585334
A manufacturer becoming service provider – challenges and a paradox
Saara Brax (2005)
10.1080/10438590500222691
Complementarities between organisational strategies and innovation
Brian P. Cozzarin (2006)
10.2307/1059499
Technical Change and Economic Theory
G. Dosi (1989)
10.1177/014920630202800309
Managing Service Organizations: Does Having a “Thing” Make a Difference?
J. T. Bowen (2002)
10.1016/J.RESPOL.2010.01.010
Technological regimes and the variety of innovation behaviour: Creating integrated taxonomies of firms and sectors
M. Peneder (2010)
10.1504/IJSTM.2008.019704
Customer-based innovation of knowledge e-services: the importance of after-innovation
Jon Sundbo (2008)
10.1016/J.RESPOL.2008.03.011
Technological paradigms, regimes and trajectories: Manufacturing and service industries in a new taxonomy of sectoral patterns of innovation
F. Castellacci (2008)
Information Technology, Workplace Organization and the Demand for Skilled Labor: Firm-Level Evidence
Timothy F. Bresnahan (2002)
Innovation in the Service Economy: The New Wealth of Nations
Faïz Gallouj (2002)
10.1016/0263-2373(88)90033-3
Servitization of business: Adding value by adding services
S. Vandermerwe (1988)
10.1162/QJEC.2007.122.4.1721
How Does Information Technology Affect Productivity? Plant-Level Comparisons of Product Innovation, Process Improvement, and Worker Skills
Ann P. Bartel (2007)
Towards a new understanding of innovativeness - and of innovation based indicators
S. Laestadius (2005)
10.4337/9781849803304.00012
Services and Innovation and Service Innovation: New Theoretical Directions
J. Howells (2010)
10.4337/9781781954201.00036
Innovation and Training
M. Warner (1995)
10.4337/9781849803304.00022
Service innovation: Development, delivery and performance
J. Tidd (2010)
10.1016/0166-4972(96)00029-6
The balancing of empowerment. A strategic resource based model of organizing innovation activities in service and low-tech firms
Jon Sundbo (1996)
10.1108/17410380910960984
The servitization of manufacturing: A review of literature and reflection on future challenges
T. Baines (2009)
10.2307/2118467
Changes in the Demand for Skilled Labor within U. S. Manufacturing: Evidence from the Annual Survey of Manufactures
Eli Berman (1994)
10.2139/ssrn.1010301
Non-Technological and Technological Innovation: Strange Bedfellows?
T. Schmidt (2007)
10.1016/S0040-1625(00)00091-3
Internationalization of services: A technological perspective
M. Miozzo (1999)
10.4337/9781849803304.00023
The Toilsome Path of Service Innovation: The Effects of the Law of Low Human Multi-task Capability
Jon Sundbo (2010)
10.1016/J.RESPOL.2011.02.003
Innovation capacity and innovation development in small enterprises. A comparison between the manufacturing and service sectors
Helena Forsman (2011)
10.1080/13662710500087891
Do Services Innovate (Differently)? Insights from the European Innobarometer Survey
B. Tether (2005)
La estrutura sectorial como factor determinante de la intensidad tecnológica de los países
F. Carrasco (2008)
10.4337/9781843765370
Innovation in the Service Economy
Faïz Gallouj (2002)
10.1108/00251740910984578
Towards a multidisciplinary definition of innovation
Anahita Baregheh (2009)
10.1016/0048-7333(84)90018-0
Sectoral Patterns of Technical Change : Towards a Taxonomy and a Theory : Research Policy
K. Pavitt (1984)
10.1108/08858620510583669
Behavioral implications of the transition process from products to services
Heiko Gebauer (2005)
10.4337/9781781954201
The Handbook of Industrial Innovation
M. Dodgson (1994)
10.1016/J.RESPOL.2010.08.004
The economic impact of technological and organizational innovations. A firm-level analysis
R. Evangelista (2010)
10.1093/ICC/DTH029
Moving base into high-value integrated solutions: a value stream approach
A. Davies (2004)
10.1016/S0048-7333(02)00091-4
Innovation modes in the Swiss service sector: a cluster analysis based on firm-level data
H. Hollenstein (2001)
10.1093/REV/5.3.207
Measuring innovation in services
R. Evangelista (1995)



This paper is referenced by
Semantic Scholar Logo Some data provided by SemanticScholar