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Lipo-chitooligosaccharidic Nodulation Factors And Their Perception By Plant Receptors

J. Fliegmann, J. Bono
Published 2015 · Biology, Medicine

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Lipo-chitooligosaccharides produced by nitrogen-fixing rhizobia are signaling molecules involved in the establishment of an important agronomical and ecological symbiosis with plants. These compounds, known as Nod factors, are biologically active on plant roots at very low concentrations indicating that they are perceived by specific receptors. This article summarizes the main strategies developed for the syntheses of bioactive Nod factors and their derivatives in order to better understand their mode of perception. Different Nod factor receptors and LCO-binding proteins identified by genetic or biochemical approaches are also presented, indicating perception mechanisms that seem to be more complicated than expected, probably involving multi-component receptor complexes.
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