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Detection And Determination Of Ochratoxin A In Grape Products

A. Venâncio
Published 2008 · Chemistry

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Publisher Summary Ochratoxin A is a mycotoxin often found in grapes and grape products. Ochratoxin A is a toxic compound that needs to be manipulated with care and with appropriate safety precautions. Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a secondary metabolite produced by strains of a few filamentous fungi species. Because of its toxic properties and the fact that it is detected in food, this metabolite is known as a mycotoxin. OTA is an important nephrotoxic mycotoxin having also immunosuppressive, terratogenic, genotoxic, and carcinogenic effects and was classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer as a carcinogenic metabolite belonging to group 2B. In addition, the analytical methodology for the detection of contaminants in foods involves a sequence of five steps—sampling; sample preparation; extraction; clean-up; and quantification. Determination of mycotoxins from any food commodity requires a step for the solubilization of the mycotoxin with an appropriate solvent. In most of the cases, this is done with an immiscible solvent; however, in same cases, with liquid foods it is possible to omit the liquid–liquid extraction step, replacing it by a dilution with an appropriate aqueous solvent. When the food sample is a solid matrix, the solid–liquid extraction is usually carried out in a blender over a defined period of time.
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