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Lipo-chitooligosaccharide Signaling In Endosymbiotic Plant-microbe Interactions.

C. Gough, J. Cullimore
Published 2011 · Biology, Medicine

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The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) and the rhizobia-legume (RL) root endosymbioses are established as a result of signal exchange in which there is mutual recognition of diffusible signals produced by plant and microbial partners. It was discovered 20 years ago that the key symbiotic signals produced by rhizobial bacteria are lipo-chitooligosaccharides (LCO), called Nod factors. These LCO are perceived via lysin-motif (LysM) receptors and activate a signaling pathway called the common symbiotic pathway (CSP), which controls both the RL and the AM symbioses. Recent work has established that an AM fungus, Glomus intraradices, also produces LCO that activate the CSP, leading to induction of gene expression and root branching in Medicago truncatula. These Myc-LCO also stimulate mycorrhization in diverse plants. In addition, work on the nonlegume Parasponia andersonii has shown that a LysM receptor is required for both successful mycorrhization and nodulation. Together these studies show that structurally related signals and the LysM receptor family are key components of both nodulation and mycorrhization. LysM receptors are also involved in the perception of chitooligosaccharides (CO), which are derived from fungal cell walls and elicit defense responses and resistance to pathogens in diverse plants. The discovery of Myc-LCO and a LysM receptor required for the AM symbiosis, therefore, not only raises questions of how legume plants discriminate fungal and bacterial endosymbionts but also, more generally, of how plants discriminate endosymbionts from pathogenic microorganisms using structurally related LCO and CO signals and of how these perception mechanisms have evolved.
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10.3390/jof7090719
A Critical Review on Communication Mechanism within Plant-Endophytic Fungi Interactions to Cope with Biotic and Abiotic Stresses
Hongyun Lu (2021)
10.1007/S13199-021-00793-1
Quo vadis: signaling molecules and small secreted proteins from mycorrhizal fungi at the early stage of mycorrhiza formation
Chu Wu (2021)
10.1007/S00344-021-10392-5
Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi in Conferring Tolerance to Biotic Stresses in Plants
Bhaskar Dowarah (2021)
10.1007/978-981-15-6125-2
Rhizosphere Biology: Interactions Between Microbes and Plants
A. Sharma (2021)
10.3390/microorganisms9040774
Regulation of Plant Mineral Nutrition by Signal Molecules
V. Kalia (2021)
10.1111/mec.15506
Gene flow in the anemone Anthopleura elegantissima limits signatures of local adaptation across an extensive geographic range
Brendan H. Cornwell (2020)
10.1101/2020.09.09.285668
Distinct genetic bases for plant root responses to lipo-chitooligosaccharide signal molecules from distinct microbial origins
M. Bonhomme (2020)
10.1016/j.carres.2020.108018
Total synthesis of Myc-IV(C16:0, S) via automated electrochemical assembly.
K. Yano (2020)
10.3389/fsufs.2020.00106
The Roles of Plant Growth Promoting Microbes in Enhancing Plant Tolerance to Acidity and Alkalinity Stresses
Levini A. Msimbira (2020)
10.3389/fpls.2020.610065
Benefits to Plant Health and Productivity From Enhancing Plant Microbial Symbionts
G. Harman (2020)
10.1016/j.tim.2020.08.005
The Molecular Language of the Cnidarian-Dinoflagellate Symbiosis.
S. Rosset (2020)
10.1111/nph.16715
Ectomycorrhizal fungi induce systemic resistance against insects on a non-mycorrhizal plant in a CERK1-dependent manner.
Kishore Vishwanathan (2020)
10.1016/bs.abr.2019.09.006
Rhizobium diversity in the light of evolution
M. Tang (2020)
10.1007/978-981-15-3151-4
Phytobiomes: Current Insights and Future Vistas
Manoj Kumar Solanki (2020)
10.1080/07388551.2020.1808584
Plants endophytes: unveiling hidden agenda for bioprospecting toward sustainable agriculture
A. Dubey (2020)
10.1007/978-3-030-51916-2_1
Current Status–Enlightens in Its Biology and Omics Approach on Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Community
Tulasikorra (2020)
10.1007/978-981-15-3151-4_12
Endophytic Phytobiomes as Defense Elicitors: Current Insights and Future Prospects
Satyendra P. Singh (2020)
10.1007/978-981-15-6125-2_13
Inter-Organismal Signaling in the Rhizosphere
M. Antar (2020)
10.3390/su12135446
Understanding Phytomicrobiome: A Potential Reservoir for Better Crop Management
P. Bhatt (2020)
10.1104/pp.19.01420
Duplication of Symbiotic Lysin Motif Receptors Predates the Evolution of Nitrogen-Fixing Nodule Symbiosis1
Luuk Rutten (2020)
10.1002/csc2.20252
Influence of Nod factors on the quantity and distribution in faba bean of symbiotically fixed nitrogen as determined by the 15 N isotope dilution method
A. Siczek (2020)
10.1002/9781119409144.ch61
Role of phytohormones in arbuscular mycorrhiza development
D. Das (2019)
10.1111/nph.15798
Molecular dialogue between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and the nonhost plant Arabidopsis thaliana switches from initial detection to antagonism.
Iván Fernández (2019)
10.1016/J.CARBPOL.2019.05.050
A review on the preparation of chitosan oligosaccharides and application to human health, animal husbandry and agricultural production.
Xubing Yuan (2019)
Study of bacteria involved in Acacia longifolia nodulation: influence of fire on symbiosis establishment
Joana Guedes de Jesus (2019)
10.1111/nph.15551
Lipo-chitooligosaccharides promote lateral root formation and modify auxin homeostasis in Brachypodium distachyon.
Luis Buendia (2019)
10.1093/jxb/erz024
Proteolysis and nitrogen: emerging insights.
Anna Tornkvist (2019)
10.1007/978-3-030-12153-2
Strigolactones - Biology and Applications
H. Koltai (2019)
10.1002/9781119409144.ch60
The symbiosis of Medicago truncatula with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi
N. Dursun (2019)
10.1111/nph.15891
The Medicago truncatula LysM receptor-like kinase LYK9 plays a dual role in immunity and the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.
Chrystel Gibelin-Viala (2019)
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