Online citations, reference lists, and bibliographies.
← Back to Search

Complementing Mass Customization Toolkits With User Communities: How Peer Input Improves Customer Self‐Design*

N. Franke, P. Keinz, M. Schreier
Published 2008 · Computer Science

Save to my Library
Download PDF
Analyze on Scholarcy
Share
In this article, the authors propose that the canonical customer-toolkit dyad in mass customization (MC) should be complemented with user communities. Many companies in various industries have begun to offer their customers the opportunity to design their own products online. The companies provide web-based MC toolkits which allow customers who prefer individualized products to tailor items such as sneakers, PCs, cars, kitchens, cereals, or skis to their specific preferences. Most existing MC toolkits are based on the underlying concept of an isolated, dyadic interaction process between the individual customer and the MC toolkit. Information from external sources is not provided. As a result, most academic research on MC toolkits has focused on this dyadic perspective. The main premise of this article is that novice MC toolkit users in particular might largely benefit from information given by other customers. The pioneering research conducted by Jeppesen (2005), Jeppesen and Frederiksen (2006), and Jeppesen and Molin (2003) has shown that customers in the computer gaming and digital music instruments industries are willing to support each other for the sake of efficient toolkit use (e.g., how certain toolkit functions work). Expanding on their work, this article provides evidence that peer assistance appears also extremely useful in the two other major phases of the customer's individual self-design process, namely the development of an initial idea and the evaluation of a preliminary design solution. Two controlled experiments were conducted in which 191 subjects used an MC toolkit in order to design their own individual skis. The authors find that during the phase of developing an initial idea, having access to other users' designs as potential starting points stimulates the integration of existing solution chunks into the problem-solving process, which indicates more systematic problem-solving behavior. Peer customer input also turned out to have positive effects on the evaluation of preliminary design solutions. Providing other customers' opinions on interim design solutions stimulated favorable problem-solving behavior, namely the integration of external feedback. The use of these two problem-solving heuristics in turn leads to an improved process outcome, that is, self-designed products which meet the preferences of the customers more effectively (measured in terms of perceived preference fit, purchase intention, and willingness to pay). These findings have important theoretical and managerial implications. (author's abstract)
This paper references
How Do Architects Design? In Artificial Intelligence and Pattern Recognition in Computer Aided Design, ed
O. Akin (1978)
10.1016/0004-3702(73)90011-8
The Structure of Ill Structured Problems
H. Simon (1973)
10.1111/J.0737-6782.2004.00094.X
Value Creation by Toolkits for User Innovation and Design: The Case of the Watch Market
N. Franke (2004)
10.1111/1467-8691.00080
Fortune Favours Only the Prepared Mind: Why Sources of Inspiration are Essential for Continuing Creativity
Claudia Eckert (1998)
Reducing the risks of new product development
F. Piller (2006)
Collective Customer Commitment: Reducing the Risks of New Product Development
S. Ogawa (2006)
10.1287/MNSC.40.4.429
Sticky Information and the Locus of Problem Solving: Implications for Innovation
E. Hippel (1994)
10.2307/41166317
Principles for User Design of Customized Products
T. Randall (2005)
10.1037/0021-9010.64.4.349
Consequences of individual feedback on behavior in organizations.
D. R. Ilgen (1979)
10.1016/0010-4485(95)00055-0
Case-based conceptual design information server for concurrent engineering
W. Wood (1996)
10.1016/0004-3702(80)90025-9
Artificial intelligence and pattern recognition in computer aided design: J. C. Latombe (Ed.), North-Holland, Amsterdam, 1978, $60.00
R. Sproull (1980)
10.1080/01621459.1966.10480897
Consumer Buying Intentions and Purchase Probability: An Experiment in Survey Design
F. Juster (1966)
10.1016/B978-0-08-009237-9.50018-4
Seeking and Avoiding Self-evaluation by Working Individually or in Groups*
B. Willerman (1960)
10.1111/j.1467-9310.2006.00433.x
Learning from Leading-Edge Customers at the Sims: Opening Up the Innovation Process Using Toolkits
Reinhard Pruegl (2006)
10.2307/256442
SELF-REGULATION FOR MANAGERIAL EFFECTIVENESS: THE ROLE OF ACTIVE FEEDBACK SEEKING
S. Ashford (1991)
10.1016/0010-0285(73)90004-2
Perception in chess
W. Chase (1973)
10.1080/09652540500511255
A tale of tales: the Apple Newton narratives
Hope Jensen Schau (2006)
10.1097/00005053-196608000-00011
Cognition and Thought
G. R. Lockhead (1966)
The four faces of mass customization.
Gilmore Jh (1997)
10.1016/S0048-7333(03)00061-1
Profiting from Voluntary Information Spillovers: How Users Benefit by Freely Revealing Their Innovations
D. Harhoff (2003)
10.1109/64.163668
Case-based design support: a case study in architectural design
M. Pearce (1992)
10.1016/S0926-5805(00)00098-4
Coding and Modelling Communication in Architectural Collaborative Design
G. Gabriel (1999)
USER DESIGN OF CUSTOMIZED PRODUCTS
T. Randall (2007)
10.1016/0030-5073(83)90156-3
FEEDBACK AS AN INDIVIDUAL RESOURCE: PERSONAL STRATEGIES OF CREATING INFORMATION
S. Ashford (1983)
10.1016/S0048-7333(02)00006-9
How Communities Support Innovative Activities: An Exploration of Assistance and Sharing Among End-Users
Sonali K. Shah (2003)
10.1016/S0142-694X(01)00009-6
Creativity in the design process: co-evolution of problem–solution
C. Dorst (2001)
10.1080/09537320310001601531
Consumers as Co-developers: Learning and Innovation Outside the Firm
L. Jeppesen (2003)
How do Architects Design
Ömer Akin (1978)
10.2139/ssrn.405060
Determinants of Customers' Responses to Customized Offers: Conceptual Framework and Research Propositions
I. Simonson (2003)
10.1287/MNSC.48.7.821.2817
Shifting Innovation to Users via Toolkits
E. Hippel (2002)
10.1002/CB.183
The value increment of mass-customized products: An empirical assessment
M. Schreier (2006)
10.1111/1540-5885.1840247
User toolkits for innovation
E. Hippel (2001)
10.1080/07370024.1990.9667157
Designing the Design Process: Exploiting Opportunistic Thoughts
R. Guindon (1990)
How Designers Think: The Design Process Demystified
B. Lawson (1990)
10.1016/0092-6566(79)90028-X
Determinants of information-seeking behavior
M. Zuckerman (1979)
10.1177/002224297503900316
A Survey Technique to Measure Demand under Various Pricing Strategies
D. F. Jones (1975)
10.1016/J.FUTURES.2006.12.009
Peer review and the relevance of science
Alister Scott (2007)
10.1287/MKSC.1050.0116
Research Note: User Design of Customized Products
T. Randall (2007)
10.1016/S0737-6782(01)00090-X
PERSPECTIVE: User toolkits for innovation
E. Hippel (2001)
Customers As Innovators: A New Way to Create Value
S. Thomke (2002)
10.1002/asi.20446
Democratizing innovation
John Cullen (2006)
10.1016/S0142-694X(96)00023-3
Design and other types of fixation
A. Purcell (1996)
10.5465/AMR.1991.4279472
Impression Management in the Feedback-Seeking Process: A Literaturereview and Research Agenda
E. Morrison (1991)
On the Nature of Expertise.
S. Kay (1992)
10.1006/ijhc.2000.0372
Putting ethnography to work: the case for a cognitive ethnography of design
L. Ball (2000)
10.1177/0146167206289408
When Do Ego Threats Lead to Self-Regulation Failure? Negative Consequences of Defensive High Self-Esteem
Kathleen Hoffman Lambird (2006)
10.1111/J.0737-6782.2005.00131.X
User Toolkits for Innovation: Consumers Support Each Other
L. Jeppesen (2005)
10.1207/s15516709cog1603_3
The Structure of Design Problem Spaces
V. Goel (1992)
10.1037/H0080061
The role of learning from examples in the acquisition of recursive programming skills.
P. Pirolli (1985)
10.1509/jmkr.42.2.219.62293
Marketing Mass-Customized Products: Striking a Balance between Utility and Complexity
B. Dellaert (2005)
10.1111/1540-4560.00247
Can you see the real me? Activation and expression of the "true self" on the Internet.
J. Bargh (2002)
10.1145/50087.50089
A field study of the software design process for large systems
B. Curtis (1988)
10.2307/2063712
Human Problem Solving
A. Newell (1973)
10.1287/orsc.1050.0156
Why Do Users Contribute to Firm-Hosted User Communities? The Case of Computer-Controlled Music Instruments
L. Jeppesen (2006)
10.1207/s15516709cog2203_4
Analogy Events: How Examples are Used During Problem Solving
K. VanLehn (1998)
FORMALISING DESIGN EXPLORATION AS CO-EVOLUTION: A Combined Gene Approach
M. Maher (1996)
How Do Architects Design? In: Latombe (ed.), Artificial Intelligence and Pattern Recognition in Computer Aided Design
O. Akin (1978)
10.1207/s15516709cog1302_1
Self-Explonations: How Students Study and Use Examples in Learning to Solve Problems
M. Chi (1989)
10.1016/0001-6918(95)00057-7
Supporting evaluation in design
N. Bonnardel (1996)
10.1016/S0022-4359(99)80105-5
Variety for sale: Mass customization or mass confusion?
C. Huffman (1998)
10.1080/00140139408964950
Cognitive processes in engineering design: a longitudinal study
L. Ball (1994)



This paper is referenced by
10.1111/J.1540-5885.2011.00801.X
Perspective: The Emergence of Product Design as a Field of Marketing Inquiry†
Michael G. Luchs (2011)
10.4018/978-1-4666-8353-2.CH008
The Usage of Social Media in New Product Development Process: The Benefits and the Challenges
R. Liu (2015)
10.1007/978-3-319-31686-4_10
3D Printing as Driver of Localized Manufacturing: Expected Benefits from Producer and Consumer Perspectives
Christoph Ihl (2016)
10.1108/JSM-04-2014-0115
Mass customization for financial services: an empirical study of adoption and usage behavior
Stefan Koch (2015)
Summer 6-15-2016 SIMPLIFYING SOLUTION SPACE : A MULTIPLE CASE STUDY ON 3 D PRINTING TOOLKITS
H. Naik (2017)
10.1111/J.1540-5885.2011.00881.X
Sourcing, Filtering, and Evaluating New Product Ideas: An Empirical Exploration of the Performance of Idea Markets
Arina Soukhoroukova (2012)
Knowledge Characteristics and Organisational Practices in User Innovation
Y. M. Ooi (2016)
10.1016/j.dss.2012.12.045
Testing the moderating effects of toolkits and user communities in personalization: The case of social networking service
Y. Wang (2013)
10.4018/jebr.2013070101
Usage of Pre-Made Text-Modules and Peer-Groups for Mitigating Information Asymmetry in Social Lending: Evidence on Funding Success from German Platform Smava
A. Frerichs (2013)
The Effect of Incorporating End-User Customization into Additive Manufacturing Designs
J. Ashley (2018)
User involvement in design: a case study of using an AM-enabled mass customisation and personalisation (MC&P) toolkit
Hesam Yavari (2015)
10.29358/SCECO.V0I20.268
RELATIONAL MECHANISMS IN INNOVATION CO-CREATION
Rodica Boier (2014)
10.25300/MISQ/2015/39.3.07
Comparing Potential and Actual Innovators: An Empirical Study of Mobile Data Services Innovation
A. Kankanhalli (2015)
10.1145/2482991.2483008
How user communities improve mass customization productivity
Simon Straßburger (2013)
10.1007/978-3-642-39473-7_1
User Driven Service Design and Innovation Platforms
B. Bergvall-Kåreborn (2013)
10.1109/TEM.2018.2839616
Inventory Management in Mass Customization Operations: A Review
S. Guo (2019)
Online Service Co-Customization: How the Partner and the Information Presentation Affects Tourists' Choice of Online Tour Services
L. Zhou (2016)
Knowing is Silver, Listening is Gold: On the importance and impact of feedback in IT-based innovation contests
S. Adamczyk (2011)
10.1016/J.JRETAI.2018.04.002
Breathing Down Your Neck
M. Dahm (2018)
10.1016/J.JENGTECMAN.2015.08.002
The Lag-User Method
Sara F. Jahanmir (2015)
10.1007/s12159-015-0129-0
Challenges and future perspectives for the life cycle of manufacturing networks in the mass customisation era
D. Mourtzis (2016)
10.1111/j.1467-8691.2010.00567.x
Virtual Communities for Innovation: Influence Factors and Impact on Company Innovation
A. Schröder (2010)
10.5172/impp.2012.14.3.416
Web-based customer innovation: A replication with extension
N. Ryzhkova (2012)
10.1017/dsd.2020.20
DERIVATION OF STARTING SOLUTIONS BASED ON PRODUCT ARCHITECTURE FLEXIBILITY EVALUATION
M. Riesener (2020)
Unpacking Stickiness: Understanding Core Issues Associated with Accessing and Implementing User Knowledge
Y. M. Ooi (2013)
10.1080/13511610.2012.660324
Intelligent cities as smart providers: CoPs as organizations for developing integrated models of eGovernment Services
M. Deakin (2012)
10.1111/JPIM.12137
Mass or Only “Niche Customization”? Why We Should Interpret Configuration Toolkits as Learning Instruments
N. Franke (2014)
10.1108/IJCTHR-06-2016-0062
Room with a view: how hedonic and utilitarian choice options of online travel agencies affect consumers’ booking intentions
Ursula Scholl-Grissemann (2016)
10.3996/1944-687x-8.1.2
Special thanks to the reviewers
S. Bensch (2014)
10.1111/JADE.12054
Cognitive Activity-Based Design Methodology for Novice Visual Communication Designers
H. Kim (2016)
10.1111/radm.12327
The Choice between Uniqueness and Conformity in Mass Customization
M. Zaggl (2019)
Value creation through mass customization : an empirical analysis of the requisite strategic capabilities
Thorsten Harzer (2013)
See more
Semantic Scholar Logo Some data provided by SemanticScholar