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Variation In Microbial Community Structure In Two Boreal Peatlands As Determined By Analysis Of Phospholipid Fatty Acid Profiles.

I. Sundh, M. Nilsson, P. Borgå
Published 1997 · Biology, Medicine

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Analyses of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) were used to assess variation in community structure and total microbial biomass in two boreal peatlands in Sweden. The total PLFA concentration in peat ranged from 0.16 to 7.0 nmol g of wet peat(sup-1) (median, 0.70 nmol g of wet peat(sup-1)). Principal-component analysis of PLFA data revealed that the degree of depth-related variation in PLFA composition was high among peatland habitats, with general differences between wet sites, with water tables within a few centimeters of the moss surface, and dry sites, with water tables >10 cm below the moss surface. However, variation in PLFA composition over the growing season was negligible. In the principal-component analyses, most PLFAs were determined to be parts of clusters of covarying fatty acids, suggesting that they originated in the same functional groups of microorganisms. Major clusters were formed by monounsaturated (typical of gram-negative eubacteria), terminally branched (gram-positive or anaerobic gram-negative eubacteria), methyl-branched and branched unsaturated (sulfate-reducing bacteria and/or actinomycetes), (omega)8 monounsaturated (methane-oxidizing bacteria), and polyunsaturated (eucaryotes) PLFAs. Within the clusters, PLFAs had rather distinct concentration-depth distributions. For example, PLFAs from sulfate-reducing bacteria and/or actinomycetes and those from methane-oxidizing bacteria had maximum concentrations slightly below and at the average water table depth, respectively.
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