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Chronic Paroxysmal Hemicrania (CPH): A Review Of The Clinical Manifestations

O. Sjaastad, F. Antonaci
Published 1989 · Medicine

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On a world-wide basis, 84 cases of CPH were found, 59 females and 25 males: 1.e. a F:M ratio of 2.36. The diagnostic criteria have not been stated in all reports. We have used the diagnostic criteria set forth by Merskey et a1 (1) and Sjaastad (2). The inclusion criteria were: a generally relatively high maximum frequency of attacks (i.e. >4/day) during symptomatic period as well as an absolute indomethacin effect. It has, furthermore been deemed highly desireable that the location of the headache be unilateral. The mean age of onset was 34.1216.7 (range 11-81). A positive family history of migraine was found in 23x of the patients. CPH started immediately post-partum in 5/10 cases while it disappeared during pregnancy in 9/10 cases. The site of maximal pain was located in the ocular and temporal areas. Pn unchanging unilaterality was the rule in that only 3 exceptions have been reported (3.X). In these patients, there may have been a shift of the pain side from the remitting to the non-remitting stage; this figure is obviously different from from that in cluster headache (approximately 15x1. The pain was excruciating at the peak of attack in 67 patients, where such information was available. During attacks, the patients tried to sit quietly, holding the head in the hands or curled up in bed (n=15), or paced the floor (n=18) or both (n=7). The mean duration of the single attack was 20.9+20,4 minutes (range 2-120). There was a considerable fluctuation in attack frequency with a mean of 10.825.0 (range 1-40). Highly varying attack frequency and duration have been reported in 37 patients, Lacrimation, nasal stenosis, conjunctival injection, and rhinorrhea on the symptomatic side were the most frequent symptoms and signs accompanying the attack. Fifty-five out of 58 cases experienced nocturnal attacks; usually
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